Navigation Links
Common MS drugs taken together do not reduce relapse risk
Date:3/11/2013

A recent clinical trial found that interferonβ-1a (INF) and glatiramer acetate (GA), two of the most commonly prescribed drugs for multiple sclerosis (MS), provide no additional clinical benefit when taken together. While findings published today in Annals of Neurology, a journal of the American Neurological Association and Child Neurology Society, suggest that taking both INF and GA together was not superior to GA monotherapy in reducing relapse risk; the combination therapy does appear to reduce new lesion activity and total lesion volume.

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) describes MS as a neuroinflammatory disease, which affects the central nervous system by attacking myelin, a substance found in nerve fibers. NINDS estimates that up to 350,000 individuals in the U.S. are diagnosed with MS, which affects twice as many women as men, with most symptoms appearing between the ages of 20 and 40. Experts believe this complex autoimmune disease may be caused by genetic and environmental factors.

"While there are a number of drugs to treat MS, our study is the first to investigate if the concurrent use of two drugs with different modes of action would provide any additional clinical benefit without side effects," explains lead author Dr. Fred Lublin, Director of the Corinne Goldsmith Dickinson Center for Multiple Sclerosis at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York. "The CombiRx study was designed to assess whether IFN and GA in combination was more effective than either alone in reducing relapse of MS."

The research team enrolled 1,008 participants from 68 sites in this double-blind, randomized, controlled phase III trial. Participants received IFN plus GA (499), IFN alone (250), or GA alone (259), with 30g IFN administered intramuscularly weekly and/or 20 mg of GA injected daily. The groups were followed for three years to assess if the combination therapy reduced MS relapse rates.

Trial results found that the IFN plus GA combination did not lessen disease progression according to the Expanded Disability Status Scale (a measure of disability caused by MS) or show change in the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (measure used during clinical trials to assess leg, arm, and cognitive function in MS patients) better than the individual agents over a three-year period. The combination therapy and GA alone were significantly better than IFN in reducing relapse risk. MRI findings also suggested that the IFN plus GA together were better in reducing new lesions (plaques) and total lesion accumulation than either drug alone.

Dr. Lublin concludes, "Combining two of the most commonly prescribed MS therapies did not produce significant clinical benefit, reducing relapse risk, during the three-year study period. We will continue to monitor this group to determine if the combination therapy displays positive results, particularly in reducing lesion activity, beyond the initial trial timeframe."

In a related editorial, Dr. Stephen L. Hauser, Department of Neurology Chair at University of California, San Francisco and Editor-in-Chief of Annals adds, "In the end, CombiRx was essentially a negative study, with the combination therapy doing no better than monotherapy in reducing MS relapse rate over three years. However, the continued follow-up of this group by Dr. Lublin and colleagues provides an opportunity to develop a comprehensive long-term history of MSassessing response to first-generation therapies, possibly predicting individual disease trajectories, and understanding of treatment response. CombiRx could emerge as a model for long-term assessment, not only in MS, but across clinical neuroscience."


'/>"/>

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley
Source:Eurekalert


Related medicine news :

1. Texting in College Classrooms Common, Distracting
2. Recovery from propofol anesthesia may be sped by use of common stimulant
3. Long-term neuropsychological impairment is common in acute lung injury survivors
4. Overuse Injuries Common Among Female College Athletes
5. Common Blood Pressure Drug Safe for Heart Failure: Study
6. Test links strains of common parasite to severe illness in US newborns
7. Common Plastics Chemical Might Boost Diabetes Risk
8. Off-Label Drug Use Appears Common
9. Global, common approach to pharmaceutical supply chain integrity the focus of workshop
10. Slow-growing babies more likely in normal-weight women; Less common in obese pregnancies
11. Common Blood Pressure Drugs May Not Cut Colon Cancer Risk
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/18/2014)... (April 21, 2014) -- A group of scientists ... and the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging has found ... and neuropsychological function in Parkinson,s disease (PD). ... , the study, which assessed cognitive function in ... the dopamine replacement therapy commonly used to treat ...
(Date:4/18/2014)... memories? How did it make you feel? According to ... experience, such as how sad you were or how ... when you can,t stop thinking about it. , ... context of the memories, rather than how you felt, ... the negative effects of these memories, a new study ...
(Date:4/18/2014)... scientists could lead to potential new treatments for breaking ... , Fibrosis, or scarring, is a hallmark of ... lungs can lead to serious organ damage and, in ... options centers on findings made by Swati Bhattacharyya, PhD, ... that a specific protein plays in promoting fibrosis. ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... One of the most popular vaccine brands for children ... may be overlooking some cost factors when choosing vaccines, ... expensive option, according to a new study by University ... administer can be driven by numerous factors," says Sheldon ... professor of computer science and of mathematics at the ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... In a review published in the April issue of ... The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, says it,s time ... approach to treating sepsis, which kills millions ... Sepsis occurs when molecules released into the bloodstream to ... body. Inflammation is necessary for maintaining good health ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):Health News:Treating depression in PD patients: New research 2Health News:New study suggests a better way to deal with bad memories 2Health News:New study suggests a better way to deal with bad memories 3Health News:New clues on tissue scarring in scleroderma 2Health News:Study recalculates costs of combination vaccines 2Health News:Feinstein Institute researcher publishes new perspective on sepsis 2
(Date:1/15/2014)...  Celsion Corporation (the "Company") (NASDAQ: CLSN ) ... investors to purchase an aggregate of approximately $15 million ... direct offering, led by a dedicated health care fund. ... with these investors pursuant to which the Company agreed ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... 2014  Humberto C. Antunes,  Galderma  worldwide CEO, will receive ... Journal of Drugs in Dermatology (JDD) at the ... event is January 17-20, 2014, at the Omni Orlando Resort at ... The ODAC is a distinguished event that delivers ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. , Jan. 15, 2014  In an ... C. difficile and TB in ambulances and other transport vehicles, an ... being used by rescue personnel for the first time. ... coming in contact with these deadly pathogens, West Palm ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:Celsion Corporation Announces $15 Million At-The-Market Registered Direct Offering 2Celsion Corporation Announces $15 Million At-The-Market Registered Direct Offering 3Galderma's global leader honored with a "Lifetime in Dermatology Achievement Award" by Journal of Drugs in Dermatology 2Galderma's global leader honored with a "Lifetime in Dermatology Achievement Award" by Journal of Drugs in Dermatology 3Galderma's global leader honored with a "Lifetime in Dermatology Achievement Award" by Journal of Drugs in Dermatology 4Superbugs No Longer Ride In Rescue Vehicles 2