HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
After massive experiment, results favor wildlife corridors

GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- To combat urban sprawl and protect wildlife, many communities have set aside land for wildlife corridors linking natural areas to one another.

Public support for these greenways, however, has overshadowed a long-running debate among ecologists about whether they actually achieve their presumed benefits. The debate has been hobbled by a lack of definitive data, with many studies based solely on observations and others only on small-scale experiments, scientists say.

A University of Florida-led study may help resolve the issue. Set to appear next week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study examines two barometers of healthy ecosystems plant pollination by insects and the dispersal of seeds by birds and concludes that corridors encourage the movement of plants and animals across "fragmented" landscape. The findings of the study are important, its authors say, because it is based on a much larger and more ambitious experiment than typically attempted.

"This is by far the largest experimental look at the effects of corridors that has ever been done," said Josh Tewksbury, a UF postdoctoral associate and the study's lead author.

Intuitively, wildlife corridors make sense. First envisioned as early as the 1960s, they are seen as ways to allow wildlife and plants to spread across natural landscapes that have been cut into pieces by roads, development, logging or other disturbances. The idea is that corridors not only allow animals to find new resources, they also prevent the isolation of species isolation that can lead to localized extinction if the habitat fragments are not accessible for reproduction or recolonization. Finding support for this seemingly simple theory, however, is more difficult than might appear, said Doug Levey, a UF professor of zoology and one of the study's authors.

Previous studies have shown that wild areas connected by corridors have more wildlife or greater biodiversi
'"/>

Contact: Josh Tewksbury
jtewksbury@zoo.ufl.edu
803-725-1769
University of Florida
16-Sep-2002


Page: 1 2 3 4

Related biology news :

1. Wildland fires: After the smoke clears
2. After natural disasters, the risk of infection, epidemics from dead bodies is negligible
3. When heme attacks: After trauma, the molecule that makes life possible rampages
4. After hooking toxin behind seafood poisoning, Science researchers may tackle prevention
5. Afterburner reduces pollution
6. Changes In Resting Energy Expenditure After Weight Loss In Obese African American And White Women
7. Amnesia After Sex: More Than A Washington Phenomenon
8. Drug Combination May Prove Effective To Prevent Recurrence Of Hepatitis C After Transplantation
9. TB Is Still Rife Fifty Years After The Study Which Found A Cure
10. Combination Therapy For Brain Tumors Holds Promise For Longer Survival After Surgery
11. New Insights On Sequence of Cell Death After Brain Injury: Understanding Cellular Events After Brain Trauma Could Lead To Better Therapies

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: After massive experiment results favor wildlife corridors

(Date:4/23/2014)... 2 million Food Standards Agency (FSA) project to map ... workers. , Norovirus outbreaks can rapidly affect large ... frozen strawberries infected 11,000 people in Germany, but there ... strains cause infection and which foods are the most ... will produce data that will help the FSA to ...
(Date:4/22/2014)... Yale researchers will lead a five-year, $3 million study ... is affecting the transport of dissolved organic matter (DOM) ... could alter the chemical composition and water quality of ... from the National Science Foundation,s MacroSystems Biology program, researchers ... watershed, which begins in Canada and runs through five ...
(Date:4/22/2014)... RIVERSIDE, Calif. Inspired by the fist-like club ... by University of California, Riverside, in collaboration with University ... design structure for composite materials that is more impact ... , "The more we study the club of this ... improve so many things we use every day," said ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Connecticut River watershed study will assess impacts of extreme rain events 2Connecticut River watershed study will assess impacts of extreme rain events 3Mantis shrimp stronger than airplanes 2Mantis shrimp stronger than airplanes 3
(Date:1/15/2014)... Rochester, NY (PRWEB) January 15, 2014 The ... cause a major disease. One of these latent viruses is ... is rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic ... the theory, a study found that RA patients have high ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... 2014 2013 was a banner year ... Technologies®. They saw continued independent research led by the ... awarded a $1 million grant from the Susanne Marcus ... Behavior” a peer reviewed journal, Amy Grant highlighted Brainwave ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... AudioNotch is the internet's leading provider ... treatment of tinnitus. Patients listen to sound therapy that ... period of weeks to months, their tinnitus volume decreases. , ... Notched Music and Notched White Noise. Now, AudioNotch is pleased ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... Date: Friday, April 11, 2014 , Time: ... 1360 Almshouse Road, Warrington, Pa. , Details: The ... to finding a cure for hepatitis B and improving the ... annual Crystal Ball on Friday, April 11 at Warrington Country ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Study: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Patients Have EBV; The CBCD Says this is Consistent with Microcompetition 2Study: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Patients Have EBV; The CBCD Says this is Consistent with Microcompetition 3Dynamic Innovative Technology Showcased at Scottsdale Company’s Open House 2Dynamic Innovative Technology Showcased at Scottsdale Company’s Open House 3Hepatitis B Foundation to Host Annual Crystal Ball Gala 2
Cached News: