HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Ancient mediterranean port city may have been holy land way station

port cities via boats.

Because of a lack of written history at Aperlae, Hohlfelder and Vann enlisted the help of Professor William Leadbetter of Edith Cowan University in Perth last June to photograph and make paper impressions of 32 Greek and Roman inscriptions found on Aperlae tombs. He believes the earliest settlers may have been war veterans from Macedonia, and that Aperlae headed a union of four regional cities intent on maintaining their independence in the first and second centuries, said Hohlfelder.

Two other Aperlae expedition members this summer, University of Denver geography Professor Don Sullivan and DU graduate student Wil Longbreak, located more than 100 agricultural terraces that once held enough olive trees, barley, wheat, vegetables, grapes and timber to make the city self-sufficient and probably produce surplus crops for limited export. But the mystery of how the townspeople collected sufficient water from the 32 known cisterns to sustain a city the size of Aperlae deepened this summer when two public baths were discovered.

"These public baths would have required an extensive amount of water," said Hohlfelder. "I think Aperlae may have had large underground cisterns in the center of the city like some other settlements in the region at the time. We just haven't found them yet."

In addition, Professor Kathleen O'Meara and four students from the Maryland Institute, College of Arts, participated in the 2000 field season by producing watercolor drawings of the submerged and standing architecture at Aperlae. "This is a back to the future' approach that is still invaluable to archaeologists, since artwork can provide clues that may not be evident in photographs," said Hohlfelder.

Leadbetter re-examined a "milestone marker" from the only paved Roman road into the city from the late third century, probably signaling the rededication of the road and city. "This inscription showed the imperial interest in Aperlae," said Hohlfel
'"/>

Contact: Robert Hohlfelder
Robert.Hohlfelder@colorado.edu
303-492-7605
University of Colorado at Boulder
23-Jul-2000


Page: 1 2 3 4

Related biology news :

1. Ancient life form may help create newest technologies
2. Ancient brewery discovered on mountaintop in Peru
3. Ancient Greeks help scientists build environmentally friendly nano devices
4. Ancient DNA mutations permitted humans to adapt to colder climates, UCI researchers find
5. Ancient Inca road in desperate need of protection
6. Ancient DNA analysis unveils mystery of historys most horribly deformed man -- The Elephant Man
7. Ancient pollen yields insight into forest biodiversity
8. Ancient defense mechanism may still be protecting us
9. Ancient flower fossil points to underwater origins
10. Ancient supernova may have triggered eco-catastrophe
11. Ancient Chinese folk remedy may hold key to non-toxic cancer treatment

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Ancient mediterranean port city may have been holy land way station

(Date:4/22/2014)... to Asia to coordinate with allies and reconfirm ... the Office of Naval Research (ONR) emphasized today ... an example of strong and growing ties between ... region. , The APTEP program, centered in Hawaii ... development of alternative energy technologies. It takes a ...
(Date:4/22/2014)... French . ... the complete genome and subsequent phylogenetic analysis show that ... that is distinct from strains previously identified in the ... also linked the laboratory confirmed cases with the initial ... virus is a lethal, highly contagious virus for which ...
(Date:4/22/2014)... that exposure to environmental enrichment can induce ... learning and memory. Previous studies have demonstrated ... the superficial layer of the cerebral cortex ... and these neurons exhibit very weak properties ... Whether environmental enrichment has an impact on ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Full power: Alternative energy partnerships flourish in Asia 2Full power: Alternative energy partnerships flourish in Asia 3Inserm and the Institut Pasteur identify a new variant of Ebola virus in Guinea 2
(Date:1/14/2014)... Jan. 14, 2014 As pet owners drew up their lists ... them wrote: "Take better care of my furry companion." Nowadays there ... and top-brand carrying cases to take the little canine or feline ... feel compelled to buy some pricey toys at the pet store. ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... and BETHESDA, Md. , Jan. 14, ... with two institutes from the National Institutes of Health ... bringing safer, more effective treatments to patients on a ... for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) and the National Eye ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... 2014  RXi Pharmaceuticals Corporation (OTCQX: RXII), a biotechnology ... therapies addressing major unmet medical needs using RNA-targeted ... of Allowance from the United States Patent and ... (sd-rxRNA®), for the treatment of fibrosis. The patent ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... USA, and Cardiff, UK (PRWEB) January 13, 2014 ... technology development leader with more than 20 years in ... for optics and photonics . Hainsey will serve as ... delighted to have Dr. Hainsey join SPIE as our ...
Breaking Biology Technology:New Year's Resolution: Give Pets the Gift of Top-Notch Health Care 2Organovo Announces Collaboration with National Institutes of Health 2Organovo Announces Collaboration with National Institutes of Health 3RXi Pharmaceuticals Receives US Notice of Allowance for a Key Patent Relating to its Self-Delivering Technology with sd-rxRNAs targeting CTGF, including RXI-109, for the Treatment of Fibrotic Disorders 2RXi Pharmaceuticals Receives US Notice of Allowance for a Key Patent Relating to its Self-Delivering Technology with sd-rxRNAs targeting CTGF, including RXI-109, for the Treatment of Fibrotic Disorders 3Photonics R&D Leader Bob Hainsey Joins SPIE Technical Staff 2
Cached News: