HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Animal research suggests plant estrogens in soy do not increase breast cancer risk

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. Research in monkeys suggests that a diet high in the natural plant estrogens found in soy does not increase the risk of breast or uterine cancer in postmenopausal women.

"This is convincing evidence that at dietary levels, the estrogens found in soy do not stimulate cell growth and other markers for cancer risk," said Charles E. Wood, D.V.M., lead researcher, from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. "The findings should be especially interesting to women at high risk for breast cancer who take soy products."

The research is reported in the current issue of The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Wood said there has been much debate about whether high levels of dietary soy are safe for postmenopausal women. Soy products are sold as a natural alternative to traditional hormone therapy. The most common form of hormone therapy, estrogen plus a progestin, has been shown to increase risk of breast cancer. Soy and some other plants contain estrogen-like compounds called isoflavones or phytoestrogens.

These plant estrogens are thousands of times weaker than the estrogen produced by the body, but may be present in much higher concentrations in the blood. Evidence about their safety has been mixed. It is known that populations that typically consume diets high in soy have lower rates of breast cancer. On the other hand, some studies have shown that soy isoflavones can stimulate breast cancer cells grown in the laboratory.

"Evidence from observational studies in women indicates that soy intake may help prevent breast cancer," said Wood. "But there has still been reluctance to conduct research studies in women because of concerns that isoflavones may stimulate breast cell growth and increase the risk of breast cancer."

Wood and colleagues measured how a diet high in soy isofllavones affected markers for breast and uterine cancer risk in postmenopausal monkeys. The monkeys ate one of
'"/>

Contact: Shannon Koontz
shkoontz@wfubmc.edu
336-716-4587
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center
6-Jul-2004


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Could vitamins raise levels of bad cholesterol? Animal study suggests they might
2. Animal studies show promise treating severe chronic pain
3. UF researcher: Animals think in their own way, but unlike humans
4. Animal studies show CA4P suppresses development and induces regression of ocular neovascularization
5. Animal study demonstrates carbon monoxide may help heart patients
6. Animals can be induced to cooperate if partners reciprocate and benefits accumulate
7. Animal study finds embryonic stem cells can repair heart muscle
8. Animal welfare can now be objectively measured
9. Animals regulate their numbers by own population density
10. UF researchers score gene therapy advance: Animal study shows high blood pressure prevented in future generations
11. Experimental Staph Vaccine Broadly Protective In Animal Studies

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:7/1/2020)... , ... July 01, 2020 , ... ... awareness and solutions for glioblastoma—the most common and aggressive adult brain cancer—announced today ... JD, PhD. Senior Fellows are charged with supporting the organization’s initiatives and overall ...
(Date:6/25/2020)... Mass. (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2020 , ... ... of cloud-based enterprise software and software-driven clinical data services that accelerate drug development, ... for low-dose selinexor, an XPO1 inhibitor, in hospitalized patients with severe COVID-19. This ...
(Date:6/23/2020)... ... 2020 , ... The field of quantitation of large molecules or proteins has ... area. However, the use of mass spectrometry in this field has gained a lot ... do you choose which approach to use (LBA or MS)?” In many cases, ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:7/1/2020)... ... June 30, 2020 , ... ... insights, today announced that the launch of a new clinical diagnostics ... about the tumor microenvironment (TME). , “Flagship’s TissueInsight is a service that ...
(Date:6/28/2020)... ... June 25, 2020 , ... With ... a vaccine or drug treatment. In an effort to better understand the cellular ... the world’s largest imaging dataset portraying therapeutic compound effects from over 1,600 approved ...
(Date:6/28/2020)... SILVER SPRING, Md. (PRWEB) , ... June 26, ... ... the leading trade association representing security solutions providers, today announced its strong opposition ... . , The bill would impose a blanket ban on most federal use ...
(Date:6/23/2020)... ... June 23, 2020 , ... DeCurtis Corporation, the premier provider ... Derek Fournier has been appointed CEO and President. Founder and former CEO, David ... , “DeCurtis Corporation has been on an incredible journey for the last twenty ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: