HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Antarctic fish study may aid cardiac research

A species of fish that lives in Antarctic waters may hold clues to climate change and lead to advances in heart medicine. Researchers from the University of Birmingham and the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) are investigating the behaviour and physiology of the 'Antarctic Cod' (Notothenia coriiceps) which became isolated from its warmer water cousins around 30 million years ago when the Antarctic circumpolar current was formed.

The olive-coloured fish has broad head and a narrow body. Whilst scientists know that it has 'antifreeze' in its blood and maintains a very low heart rate of less than 10 beats per minute, almost nothing is known about its behaviour or how it evolved to live in Antarctica's extreme environment.

Discovering how the species may cope with predicted environmental change could help stock management or conservation of biodiversity within the Southern Ocean. In addition, it is possible that this research could lead to advances in medicine, especially relating to the problems experienced by human hearts when made to beat slowly (e.g. during surgery involving heart-lung bypass) or fail to beat fast enough (e.g. as a result of hypothermia in water or exposure on a mountain).

At the BAS Rothera Research Station on the Antarctic Peninsula small acoustic tags (called 'pingers' due to the sound they make) are painlessly attached to the fish and the signals picked up by underwater microphones to monitor position, while data loggers measure heart rate. In the laboratory, Dr Hamish Campbell, monitors heart performance of the fish in a similar manner to that used with patients in a chest pain clinic. The unique combination of tracking and recording technology shows how the heart rate is controlled, and its response to changing demands due to feeding or a rise in temperature.

Physiologist Dr Stuart Egginton, from the University of Birmingham's Medical School is leading the study: He says,

"This pioneering work
'"/>

Contact: Linda Capper
L.Capper@bas.ac.uk
44-122-322-1448
British Antarctic Survey
30-Mar-2004


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Dispute over life in Antarctic lake
2. Design competition for new Antarctic Research Station
3. The Hunters Breath tells a story of adventure and discovery in Antarctica
4. A lost world: Two previously unknown dinosaurs discovered in Antarctica
5. Abandoned penguin colonies may help refine Antarctic climate studies
6. British Antarctic Survey wins environment award
7. Explanation offered for Antarcticas blood falls
8. Antarctic penguins thrive in ocean oases
9. Huge iceberg wreaks havoc on Antarctic marine ecosystem, study finds
10. Huge Antarctic iceberg makes a big splash on sea life
11. Antarctic animals are under threat from illegal fishing

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Antarctic fish study may aid cardiac research

(Date:4/15/2014)... CLEVELAND, Ohio (April 16, 2014)A new study from the ... vitamin D levels and menopause symptoms. The study was ... of The North American Menopause Society., The authors analyzed ... and a number of menopause symptoms, including hot flashes, ... women who participated in the calcium and vitamin D ...
(Date:4/15/2014)... in Greenbelt, Md., is home to hundreds of ... Goddard, some of the most cutting-edge Earth science ... that cutting-edge innovation has earned a Goddard scientist ... for Anthropology and Geography awards the Vega Medal ... shown excellence in the fields of physical geography, ...
(Date:4/15/2014)... Missouri researchers have previously shown that a genetic pre-disposition ... In a new study, Frank Booth, a professor in ... potential link between the genetic pre-disposition for high levels ... maturation occurs. , For his study, Booth selectively bred ... extreme laziness. Booth then put the rats in cages ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Low Vitamin D may not be a culprit in menopause symptoms 2Goddard scientist receives Vega Medal from King of Sweden 2Genetic pre-disposition toward exercise and mental development may be linked 2
(Date:1/15/2014)... 2014 The Microcompetition with Foreign DNA ... disease. One of these latent viruses is the Epstein ... rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic ... by the theory, a study found that RA patients ... (1). , What is Microcompetition? , Dr. Hanan ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... Sunnyvale, CA (PRWEB) January 15, 2014 ... of high throughput research solutions, today announced that ... companies, has received delivery of Freeslate’s CM ... form screening. , Lupin, headquartered in Mumbai, ... quality, affordable generic and branded formulations and Active ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... (PRWEB) January 14, 2014 Date: Friday, ... p.m. , Location: Warrington Country Club, 1360 Almshouse Road, ... Foundation, the only national nonprofit organization solely dedicated to ... quality of life for those affected worldwide, will host ... Warrington Country Club in Warrington, Pa. , Each ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... , Jan. 14, 2014  3D Communications, a leading provider ... major scientific, regulatory, business, and media events in ... , today announced its former associate Virginia Cox , ... office. Virginia Cox re-joins ... Commissioner for the Office of External Affairs at the U.S. ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Study: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Patients Have EBV; The CBCD Says this is Consistent with Microcompetition 2Study: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Patients Have EBV; The CBCD Says this is Consistent with Microcompetition 3Lupin Selects Freeslate’s CM Protégé PharmD System to Accelerate Polymorph Screening for Drug Development 2Lupin Selects Freeslate’s CM Protégé PharmD System to Accelerate Polymorph Screening for Drug Development 3Hepatitis B Foundation to Host Annual Crystal Ball Gala 2Former FDA Associate Commissioner Returns To 3D Communications 2
Cached News: