HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Anti-inflammatory drug reduces growth of cancerous tumors In rats

Research led by a nurse investigator at Johns Hopkins has found that a pain reliever commonly used to treat serious and painful forms of arthritis may also reduce the growth of malignant tumors after cancer surgery. Indomethacin, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, given to rats after surgery reduced tumor promotion by more than 50 percent, according to Gayle Page, associate professor at The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. Her study results appear in the August issue of the Journal of Pain.

"These findings provide further support to our supposition that unmanaged pain is associated with potentially life-threatening consequences," says Page. "If our results in animals prove to be similar in humans, controlling postoperative pain and inflammation must become a priority in the management of cancer patients undergoing surgery," she adds.

Prior research in animals has shown that pain and surgical trauma suppress the immune system's natural killer (NK) cells, trigger an inflammatory response and significantly increase tumor development.

Page and her co-investigator at Tel Aviv University reasoned that the relatively strong anti-inflammatory action of indomethacin would therefore affect postoperative tumor growth.

"We have already tested other pain relievers, such as morphine and fentanyl, and shown that they provide some protection against the tumor-promoting effects of surgery, but these drugs are pain relievers without anti-inflammatory action," Page says. "So we chose to test indomethacin because it eases both pain and inflammation and is injectable, giving us control in its administration."

In the study, 124 anesthetized rats, without a tendency to grow tumors, were subjected to surgery, given indomethacin, and injected with cancer cells. After surgery, female rats had an overall 200 percent increase in lung tumor growth, and tumor growth in males increased by 350 percent. Two doses of indomethacin (ei
'"/>

Contact: Kate Pipkin
pipkin@son.jhmi.edu
410-955-7552
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
19-Aug-2002


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Anti-inflammatory drug fails to prevent a hereditary colon cancer
2. Pneumococcal vaccine reduces ear infections, pneumonia, new study shows
3. Preschool bolsters early childhood immunity, reduces risk of young adult Hodgkins lymphoma
4. Structure solved at Scripps shows how one human protein reduces potency of chemotherapy
5. Underground carbon dioxide storage reduces emissions
6. Gene therapy reduces drinking in rats with genetic predisposition to alcoholism
7. Exercise reduces blood estrogens, risk for breast cancer in post menopausal women
8. Biosensor-regulated gene therapy reduces heart attack damage in mice
9. Study examines whether giving good bacteria reduces infections
10. Mastectomy dramatically reduces breast cancer risk among women with BRCA1/2 mutations
11. Dec. 17 JAMA study shows new biologic drug reduces psoriasis symptoms, improves quality of life

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:6/23/2020)... ... June 23, 2020 , ... ... monoclonal antibody development services, today announced that the company has received ISO9001:2015 ... the pharmaceutical, diagnostics, and research industries. The decision to pursue ISO9001 accreditation ...
(Date:6/23/2020)... ... , ... In its June 22 online post, business and technology news platform ... Ph.D., founder and director of stem cell biotechnology company Asymmetrex . Superb Crew ... starting July 5 it would begin offering free tissue stem cell counting ...
(Date:6/13/2020)... ... June 11, 2020 , ... Bode Technology (Bode), ... forensic genealogy team. Bode’s Forensic Genealogy Service (FGS) continues to deliver ... analysis methods. The team has added experienced genealogists, each having over a decade ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/28/2020)... ROCKY HILL, Conn. (PRWEB) , ... June 25, ... ... systems company formed to advance photodynamic therapy for treating cancer, today announced the ... Buffalo, New York (“Roswell Park”). The agreement provides Lumeda globally exclusive rights ...
(Date:6/23/2020)... ... , ... Kerafast Inc. , developers of an online ... of the Delta-G-VSV Pseudotyping System for coronavirus research applications. The system, developed by ... entry and COVID-19 vaccine effectiveness at just biosafety level 2 (BSL-2) containment. , ...
(Date:6/23/2020)... ... 2020 , ... Regen Suppliers, the one stop shop for ... get the fourth unit free with no limit on the amniotic derived exosomes. ... have been a game changer for regenerative therapies. The products are manufactured at ...
(Date:6/23/2020)... ... June 23, 2020 , ... ... therapies, today announced that it has filed an Investigational New Drug application (IND) ... clinical trial of its lead drug candidate NBTX-001 in patients with panic disorder ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: