HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Anticancer drug zebularine specifically targets tumor cells

LOS ANGELES, August 23, 2004 A novel anticancer drug that inhibits a process known as DNA methylation is preferentially taken up by tumor cells as compared to normal cells, according to a group of researchers led by scientists from the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California.

In addition, this drug--a methylation inhibitor called zebularine--is better at inhibiting cell growth and promoting gene expression in cancer cells, notes Peter Jones, Ph.D., director of the USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center and the principal investigator on the study. In a study of zebularine's effect on the rate of division of cancer cells, Jones and colleagues showed that zebularine slows growth by as much as 68 percent in cancer cells, but only by 21 percent or less in normal cells.

These findings were reported in the August 2004 issue of Cancer Cell.

Only recently have scientists begun to recognize the important role that DNA methylation--the addition of a methyl group to a stretch of DNA, which can lock, or silence, that gene--can play in the development of cancer. If methylation silences a gene that normally would control cell growth or prompt the cell to commit suicide, then the cell will grow unchecked--the hallmark of cancer.

The good news: Methylation--and its effects--can be reversible. Enter the emerging field of epigenetic therapy, in which methylation inhibitors are currently playing a starring role.

"The concept that the silencing of genes is a critical part of the cancer process is a major conceptual advance in this field," Jones says. "Realizing that, it becomes very important to find keys to unlock those silenced genes."

In the Cancer Cell study, Jones, Cheng and graduate student Christine Yoo--along with colleagues from the National Cancer Institute, the University of Miami School of Medicine, and Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark--looked at the effects zebularine had on a panel of sev
'"/>

Contact: Sarah Huoh
shuoh@usc.edu
323-442-2830
University of Southern California
23-Aug-2004


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Anticancer drug reveals alternate means of inducing cell suicide
2. The Bodys Anticancer Weaponry Backfires In Old Age
3. Enzymes "Magic" May Hold Key to Anticancer and Antimicrobial Drugs
4. Some carotenoids specifically target colon cancer
5. Images of tail of protein needed for cell multiplication suggest anticancer drug targets
6. Study suggests cell-cycle triggers might be cancer drug targets
7. Stem cell research targets cerebral palsy
8. Energy conservation targets hit by notions of comfort
9. Yale researchers discover new potential asthma therapeutic targets related to parasites and insects
10. Researchers identify two potential protein targets for new drug therapies for pancreatic cancer
11. Moving targets: when it comes to patterns, motion gets factored in

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:5/28/2020)... and FORT WORTH, Texas (PRWEB) , ... May ... ... stage biopharmaceutical company, announced today that interim results from their 1801 Phase 1/2 ... of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting which will take place virtually on May ...
(Date:5/21/2020)... ... May 19, 2020 , ... ... today introduced BioMed to their award-winning computerized maintenance management system (CMMS), TheWorxHub™. ... and systems around biomedical engineering to better allocate staff time, automate assignments, ...
(Date:5/15/2020)... ... 2020 , ... The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has selected McBee Moore ... and Tysons Corner, Virginia, to provide patent legal services under two separate ten (10) ... of chemistry. The firm is one of nine firms in the nation awarded a ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/7/2020)... (PRWEB) , ... April 06, 2020 , ... ... process solutions for the life sciences industry, has announced the release of at-home ... quickly, our top priority is the health and safety of our employees as ...
(Date:4/1/2020)... ... March 30, 2020 , ... A joint ... Diagnostics (RID), formed earlier this year to bring telehealth to various government agencies, ... for COVID-19. Company officials are currently?awaiting an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) waiver from ...
(Date:4/1/2020)... ... March 31, 2020 , ... Carterra® Inc., the world ... (LJI), announced today that they will use Carterra’s proprietary LSA™ platform to screen hundreds ... the clinic as early as this summer. , La Jolla Institute for Immunology ...
(Date:3/27/2020)... , ... March 25, 2020 ... ... the opening of its veterinary histopathology laboratory located centrally in the midwest ... the ability to work with a highly motivated, independent, professional team that ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: