HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Bacteria can't do their thing if they don't have cling

St. Louis, Nov. 15, 2002 -- Clingy bacteria often spell trouble. Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered how bacteria manufacture hair-like fibers used to cling to the lining of the kidney and bladder where they cause urinary tract infections (UTIs). The results are published in the Nov. 15 issue of the journal Cell.

"Our findings should lead to new drugs to treat UTIs by blocking the formation of these protein fibers," says study leader Scott J. Hultgren, Ph.D., the Helen Lehbrink Stoever Professor of Molecular Microbiology. "They also should improve our general understanding of how disease-causing bacteria build, fold and secrete proteins that enable them to cause disease."

Hultgren and his laboratory worked in collaboration with Gabriel Waksman, Ph.D., the Roy and Diana Vagelos Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics at the School of Medicine, whose laboratory conducted the X-ray crystallography studies showing the structure of the molecules involved in the fiber assembly process. X-ray crystallography reveals the 3-D arrangement of atoms in proteins.

UTIs are the second most common infectious disease in the United States, says Hultgren. Each year they account for 100,000 hospital admissions and 8 million doctor visits. UTIs mainly affect women, about half of whom experience at least one UTI and 20-40 percent of whom develop recurrent infections.

UTIs begin when bacteria gain a foothold on cells lining the kidney or bladder and grow into colonies. They latch onto cells using tiny fibers known as pili. Similar fibers also are produced by bacteria responsible for a variety of gastric, respiratory and other infections.

The fibers are made up of identical individual pieces, or subunits, linked together like plastic snap beads. Earlier work by Hultgren and Waksman found that as each subunit is made within a bacterium, it is joined to another molecule known as a chaperone. C
'"/>

Contact: Darrell E. Ward
wardd@msnotes.wustl.edu
314-286-0122
Washington University School of Medicine
14-Nov-2002


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Bacteria use molecular lasso to cop copper
2. Bacterial protein recycling factor possible key to new class of antibiotics
3. Bacteria spill their guts to aid researchers in quest for new antibiotics
4. Bacteria live in the esophagus!
5. Bacteria lingering in body may pose future food poisoning risks, Stanford study finds
6. Bacteria discoveries could resemble Mars, other planets
7. Bacterial relationships revealed
8. Bacteria-eating viruses may spread some infectious diseases
9. Bacteria convert food processing waste to hydrogen
10. Bacterial viruses make cheap easy vaccines
11. Bacterial infections alter allergic response

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:11/14/2019)... ... November 13, 2019 , ... NDA ... RAC , a regulatory affairs and program management executive with more than 33 ... industries, has joined the firm as an Expert Consultant. , Robert Peterson ...
(Date:11/12/2019)... Ore. (PRWEB) , ... November 12, 2019 , ... ... launching Cross-Channel Spend Optimizer that improves digital advertising performance up to 25% and ... Digital Advertising, Cross-Channel Spend Optimizer uses advanced multi-touch attribution (MTA) to predict best ...
(Date:11/9/2019)... ... ... SiteSeer Technologies, creator of SiteSeer Professional retail site selection software, is pleased to ... boutique real estate developer of single and multi-tenant buildings on sites ranging from ½ ... of markets. , Geoffrey Kerth, manager of GPK Acquisitions, says that his firm ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:11/5/2019)... ... November 04, 2019 , ... ... solutions for drugs, biologics, gene therapies, and consumer health products, today announced ... technology enhances Catalent’s proven GPEx expression platform through multiple improvements, including utilization ...
(Date:11/2/2019)... ... 2019 , ... A clinical trial usually involves many different ... principal investigators, supply chain managers, manufacturers, IRT, CRAs and so on. Lack of ... data, potentially leading to patient risk. , By having a single source of ...
(Date:10/30/2019)... ... ... While using cold plasma to kill cancer cells isn’t an entirely novel ... & Technology are exploring new ways to regulate cold plasma technology to target ... technique would prove to be a drug-free, minimally invasive cancer treatment that would affect ...
(Date:10/29/2019)... ... October 29, 2019 , ... ... its Silver sponsorship and cold chain validation workshop at the Biomanufacturing World Summit ... San Diego, California. , The Biomanufacturing World Summit brings together pharmaceutical ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: