HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Bacterial Protein Structure Hints At Mechanism Of A Class Of Premature Aging Diseases

DURHAM, N.C -- Using a bacterial model system, scientists at Duke University Medical Center have determined the first step in understanding how a new class of genetic flaws may translate into diseases.

Deepak Bastia and Steven White, professors of microbiology at Duke, have determined how a protein, called a replication termination protein (RTP), stops DNA replication in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis, a common experimental organism.

Rather than simply acting as a roadblock to replication, as had been previously thought, RTP is more like a one way door, allowing the DNA replication machinery to move in only one direction along the DNA strand, the researchers said. They said the work has implications for human disease because RTP interacts with a class of proteins known as helicases, which have been shown to be involved in several genetic diseases. Bastia is now starting work on identifying the comparable protein in humans.

The researchers' findings appear in the Nov. 29 issue of the journal Cell. The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.

RTP has been known to exist for 20 years, but it wasn't until two years ago that its structure was revealed by Bastia and White. "This [recent] work relates structure to function and takes us one step further in understanding how RTP works," Bastia said.

When DNA replicates, it unzips, starting and ending at specific sites. The helicases are responsible for pulling apart the DNA strands, which are twisted in a helical pattern. "RTP ensures that when DNA replicates, it is brought to a neat and accurate finish, and the cell knows that it is time to divide into two," White said.

Recently, helicase malfunction has been found responsible for a class of genetic diseases including Werner's syndrome and Cockayne's syndrome, premature aging syndromes; Bloom's syndrome, a type of dwarfism; and some kinds of skin cancer. Understanding of
'"/>

Contact: Karyn Hede George
georg016@mc.duke.edu
919-660-1301
Duke University
29-Nov-1996


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Bacterial protein recycling factor possible key to new class of antibiotics
2. Bacterial relationships revealed
3. Bacterial viruses make cheap easy vaccines
4. Bacterial infections alter allergic response
5. Bacterial alterations source of persistent COPD lung infections
6. Bacterial quorum-sensing structure solved
7. Bacterial control of zebra mussels, low power radio
8. Bacterial proteins cause autoimmunity in the antiphospholipid syndrome
9. Bacterial communities found to follow water
10. Bacterial strain may help clean up harmful industrial waste
11. The Largest Bacterium: Scientist Discovers New Bacterial Life Form Off The African Coast

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/17/2017)... -- NXT-ID, Inc. (NASDAQ: NXTD ) ("NXT-ID" or ... 2016 Annual Report on Form 10-K on Thursday April 13, 2017 ... ... Investor Relations section of the Company,s website at http://www.nxt-id.com  under ... http://www.sec.gov . 2016 Year Highlights: ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. , April 11, ... biometric identity management and secure authentication solutions, today ... million contract by Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity ... technologies for IARPA,s Thor program. "Innovation ... the onset and IARPA,s Thor program will allow ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... NXT-ID, Inc. (NASDAQ:   NXTD ) ... appointment of independent Directors Mr. Robin D. Richards ... Directors, furthering the company,s corporate governance and expertise. ... Gino Pereira , Chief Executive ... their guidance and benefiting from their considerable expertise as we ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/7/2017)... ... October 06, 2017 , ... ... for microscopy and surface analysis, Nanoscience Instruments is now expanding into Analytical ... broad range of contract analysis services for advanced applications. Services will leverage ...
(Date:10/7/2017)... WALTHAM, Mass. , Oct. 6, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... pioneering work of three scientists, Jacques Dubochet, ... whose breakthrough developments in cryo-electron microscopy ... this technology within the structural biology community. The ... Scientific. Scientists can now routinely produce highly resolved, ...
(Date:10/6/2017)... Washington, D.C. (PRWEB) , ... October 06, 2017 ... ... Cure) will host a lunch discussion and webinar on INSIGhT, the first-ever adaptive ... INSIGhT Principal Investigator, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. The event is free and open to ...
(Date:10/5/2017)... ... October 05, 2017 , ... Understanding the microbiome, the millions of bacteria ... Gut Love: You Are My Future, the newest exhibit on display at the University ... the human condition through the lens of the gut microbiome. , Gut Love ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: