HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Better model of cancer development sheds light on potential angiogenesis target

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers have learned that a common, cancer-linked gene thought to control blood vessel growth may not turn out to be useful as an effective target for cancer drug development. Their research, published in the October issue of Cancer Cell found that results of previous studies that pinned hope on the Id1 gene may not hold up in a mouse model thought to more accurately represent how humans get cancer.

The scientists began their study attempting to confirm previous work, including their own, suggesting that Id1 activation was an important step in tumor angiogenesis, a process that builds blood vessels needed for tumor growth.

In the earlier research on Id1, scientists used a mouse model in which tumor cells were injected directly into the animals to stimulate cancer growth: in effect, a tumor transplant. The tumors grew in the animals with Id1 activation while the injected tumors failed to grow in mice whose Id1 genes were inactivated.

"But this is not how people get cancer," says Rhoda Alani, M.D., director of the study and assistant professor of oncology, dermatology, molecular biology and genetics at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. "We get cancer through a series of genetic events that occur over time, triggered by both internal and external factors."

In the Hopkins investigator's new model, mice were exposed to carcinogens placed on their skin and allowed to gradually develop cancer. Results showed a completely opposite outcome with respect to Id1: all mice with the Id1 gene turned off developed more tumors that also were larger than in previous studies.

"Clues to promising cancer drug development are only as good as the model in which you study a process," says Alani. "If knocking out the Id1 gene in two different models produces two different results, then we need to reevaluate the role that Id1 plays in angiogenesis."

In the model using skin carcinogen exp
'"/>

Contact: Vanessa Wasta
wastava@jhmi.edu
410-955-1287
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
20-Oct-2003


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Better living through urban ecology
2. Better techniques needed to predict earthquake hazards, UC study finds
3. Natural Science and Public Health: Prescription for a Better Environment
4. Better computer modeling provides a new look at large biomolecules
5. UF nutritionist: Better to vow to eat healthy for new year
6. Better "bugs" lead to cheaper ethanol from biomass
7. Diet and cancer prevention: a sampler of story ideas for 5-a-Day for Better Health Week
8. Some Atlantic Coast Beaches Are Shrinking While Floridas Beaches Better Off Than Most
9. New Polyester Products Perform Better And Are Easy To Recycle
10. Better Binding Through Chemistry
11. Urine Tests Will Do Better Than Pelvic Exams To Save Teens From Serious Effects Of Sexually Transmitted Diseases, UCSF Analysis Shows

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:2/22/2019)... , ... February 21, 2019 , ... Clean label food ... expected when creating natural foods and beverages. It is quite common to spot consumers ... Yet, meat products are not immune to this label scrutiny. , More than ...
(Date:2/19/2019)... ... February 20, 2019 , ... ... that will see Dimensions rolled out across the organization. Dimensions provides in-depth ... across their business, support strategic planning, and understand past and future funding ...
(Date:2/14/2019)... ... February 14, 2019 , ... This year’s conference in ... 80 scientific sessions and 2,100 presentations. Given SOT’s mission to bring together researchers ... OpenLiver™ 3D cell culture model initiative that it recently launched with Biopredic ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/2/2019)... ... ... Stay on top of current hot topics through free webinars presented by leading ... free, so be sure to register today to save your place! Participate in the ... our upcoming webinars, or click below to learn more about each webinar: , CLINICAL ...
(Date:1/30/2019)... ... January 29, 2019 , ... Could a computer detect a ... tricky math problem on an online tutoring program? Could it detect deep reflection ... science assistant professor Erin Solovey is working to develop a system ...
(Date:1/24/2019)... ... ... Controlled Contamination Services is pleased to announce three exciting new additions to ... team members will support its growing operation across the US and will be a ... This addition will enable CCS to widen its reach and provide enterprise wide solutions ...
(Date:1/20/2019)... ... January 16, 2019 , ... On January 15 of ... news article by Asymmetrex director James L. Sherley, M.D., Ph.D. The ... resources like the PGCB and CellTrials.org. Now in its 21st year of operation, ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: