HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Blasting antibodies with lasers provides direct way of measuring their flexibilities

A group of scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and San Diego Supercomputer Center at the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) have used a powerful laser in combination with innovative quantum mechanical computations to measure the flexibility of mouse antibodies.

The new technique, described in an upcoming issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is significant because protein flexibility is believed to play an important role in antibody-antigen recognition, one of the fundamental events in the human immune system.

"This is the first time anybody has ever gone into a protein and experimentally measured the frequency of protein vibrations in response to an applied force," says Floyd Romesberg, assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry at The Scripps Research Institute, who led the study.

"Our results show that the motions of the antibody-antigen complexes can range over four orders of magnitude, from tens of femtoseconds to hundreds of picoseconds," says co-author Kim K. Baldridge, Ph.D., director of Integrative Computational Sciences at the San Diego Supercomputer Center and an adjunct professor of Chemistry at UCSD. "This is evidence of a general mechanism of antigen-antibody interactions--which range from rigid to flexible," she adds.

Flexibility of Proteins

Protein flexibility is an important concept in biology because of its role in protein-protein and protein-ligand recognition. One of the longest running debates in molecular recognition is how proteins recognize and bind to other molecules--whether it resembles putting a key into a lock (the lock and key model) or catching a baseball in a catcher's mitt (the induced fit model).

There are lots of ideas about mechanisms of antigen recognition postulated in the literature, but what the debate comes down to is really a question of flexibility. How flexible are proteins?

Unfortunately, fle
'"/>

Contact: Keith McKeown
kmckeown@scripps.edu
858-784-8134
Scripps Research Institute
17-Dec-2002


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Researchers find clues about how antibodies specialize
2. Second generation targeted antibodies - Its all in the binding
3. Anti-interferon beta antibodies in MS care: A consensus
4. Researchers show autoantibodies occur before lupus in New England Journal of Medicine
5. Programmable antibodies-- hybrid cancer therapy described by scientists at Scripps
6. Bodys own antibodies may drive new strains of HIV
7. Growing human antibodies in algae
8. Ozone produced by antibodies during bacterial killing and in inflammation
9. Artificial antibodies created by new molecular imprinting process
10. Human antibodies against spores found by researchers suggest new tool to detect and treat anthrax
11. Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute discover a previously unknown role for antibodies

Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/21/2014)... SAN JOSE, Calif. , Nov. 20, 2014 /PRNewswire/ ... a global leader in microcontroller (MCU) and touch technology ... digital temperature sensors with the widest V ... family delivers higher temperature accuracy and faster I 2 ... nonvolatile registers and serial EEPROM memory making them ideal ...
(Date:11/18/2014)... 2014 The Parenteral Drug Association (PDA) today confirmed ... speak and at least seven more will participate in the ... Shoreham Hotel in Washington D.C. , Dec. ... significant support from the regulatory agencies in the ... in our effort to help advance the use of metrics ...
(Date:11/12/2014)... 12, 2014 Crossmatch™, a leading provider of ... ® fingerprint readers have been deployed throughout Montparnasse ... Central Mexico . The bakery chain implemented the ... issues caused by employees clocking in for each other. ... readers, Montparnasse relied on paper timecards and a mechanical ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Atmel Launches Industry's First Wide-V(cc) Low-Power Temperature Sensor Family 2Atmel Launches Industry's First Wide-V(cc) Low-Power Temperature Sensor Family 3Atmel Launches Industry's First Wide-V(cc) Low-Power Temperature Sensor Family 4FDA's Janet Woodcock, EMA's Emer Cooke Headline PDA Quality Metrics Conference 2Montparnasse Pasteleria Achieves Time and Attendance Transparency with Crossmatch U.are.U Fingerprint Readers 2
(Date:11/26/2014)... 2014 The ETC (Emerging Technology ... innovation centers, announced today that applications for AccelerateBaltimore™ ... 1st. “Do you have a big idea?,” asked ... to know about it. AccelerateBaltimore helps you and ... in just 13 weeks.” Interested game changers ...
(Date:11/26/2014)... CA (PRWEB) November 25, 2014 Silicon ... joins forces with RPM Alliance , provider of ... pharmaceutical companies. With the latest addition to its CRO ... free validated EDC system to India. , “We ... a robust and customizable EDC platform which is both ...
(Date:11/26/2014)... 25, 2014 Miles Holder, formerly of ... Graphel Carbon Products team as Sales/Marketing Manager. Mr. Holder ... customer service for the graphite industry. , “We are ... team,” stated Dave Trinkley, VP of Market and Product ... of experience in the graphite industry, along with his ...
(Date:11/26/2014)... Theravalues Corporation est fier d,annoncer le ... au salon Hi Europe 2014 (du 2 au ... Curcumine la plus biodisponible actuellement sur le ... des ingrédients approuvés par les règlements européens. ... dans la racine de curcuma ( Curcuma longa ...
Breaking Biology Technology:AccelerateBaltimore Applications to Close in 6 Days 2AccelerateBaltimore Applications to Close in 6 Days 3RPM Alliance Joins Clinovo’s CRO Partnership Program, Further Strengthening Its Presence in Southern California and India 2Miles Holder Joins Graphel Corporation as Sales/Marketing Manager 2La curcumine présentant la plus haute biodisponibilité bientôt en vente en Europe 2La curcumine présentant la plus haute biodisponibilité bientôt en vente en Europe 3
Cached News: