HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Blood markers may reflect newborns' potential of contracting HIV

Preventing HIV-infected pregnant women from transmitting the virus to their newborns has long been a major concern for obstetricians. As such, many doctors continue to debate the benefits of elective Caesarian section as a way to protect the infant.

In high-risk pregnancies, where the viral loads can't be suppressed with medication, delivering a baby by C-section directly from the protected, sterile environment of the amniotic sac can limit the risk of HIV transmission. But in lower-risk pregnancies, where antiretroviral medications keep the virus in check, the risk of transmitting HIV to a newborn is only about 1 percent to 2 percent.

A new study by researchers at Johns Hopkins and the National Institutes of Health demonstrates that uncomplicated labor and vaginal delivery does not stimulate the babies' immune systems. Results are scheduled to be presented Jan. 18 at the annual meeting of the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine in New Orleans.

A research team led by Hopkins obstetrician Helene Bernstein, M.D., Ph.D., studied lymphocytes from the umbilical cords of 23 babies born by vaginal delivery or elective C-section, as well as cells taken from eight babies born to mothers who had chorioamnionitis (a bacterial infection of the amniotic sac) or preterm labor.

None of the women had HIV. Checking for specific biochemical markers of white blood cell activation, they found the level of cell activity to be similar among babies born by either method. In addition, when HIV was introduced to these cells in the laboratory, there was no difference in their ability to be infected.

However, the babies born to mothers with chorioamnionitis or preterm labor did show activation of their white blood cells. When HIV was introduced to the white blood cells in the laboratory, there were more infections and the virus grew quickly, meaning that these infants could be at higher risk for HIV transmission if born to HIV-infected mothers with
'"/>

Contact: Karen Blum
kblum@jhmi.edu
410-955-1534
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
18-Jan-2002


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Blood pressure hormone may inhibit growth of lung cancer
2. Blood tests identify patients on dialysis at high risk for death from cardiovascular disease
3. Blood banking systems improving in China, more progress needed
4. Blood proteins tied to inflammation
5. Bloodworms way with copper likely provides paradigm for new materials
6. Blood stem cells carry targeted genes
7. Blood vessels trigger development of the pancreas
8. Blood vessels found to signal chain of destruction in bone diseases
9. Blood markers associated with autism and mental retardation
10. Blood test for diagnosing schizophrenia
11. Blood pressure-lowering DASH diet also reduces homocysteine

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Blood markers may reflect newborns potential contracting HIV

(Date:10/15/2014)... Gauß-Allianz has admitted Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) ... science hub continues to maintain a significant nationwide ... , "The acceptance of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz ... a milestone in the national and international competition ... state of Rhineland-Palatinate can be proud that Mainz ...
(Date:10/15/2014)... , Oct. 15, 2014   Neurotechnology ... today announced the availability of the VeriLook ... Surveillance 3.0 provides real-time biometric face identification using ... digital surveillance cameras. The new version not only ... differentiates people from objects while they are moving ...
(Date:10/14/2014)... is how to produce enough food to feed the ... Agriculture Organization of the United Nations predicts that food ... to feed a growing global population, and plants are ... production. Plants—grains, cereals, fruits, vegetables, and more—feed humans ... must tap into our knowledge of how plants work ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz joins Germany's Gauss-Allianz as a full member 2Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz joins Germany's Gauss-Allianz as a full member 3VeriLook Surveillance 3.0 SDK Identifies Faces and Moving Objects, Differentiates Pedestrians from Other Moving Objects in Video Surveillance Systems 2VeriLook Surveillance 3.0 SDK Identifies Faces and Moving Objects, Differentiates Pedestrians from Other Moving Objects in Video Surveillance Systems 3Building a bridge from basic botany to applied agriculture 2Building a bridge from basic botany to applied agriculture 3
(Date:10/20/2014)... Oct. 20, 2014 Mapp Biopharmaceutical,s valiant ... antibody therapeutic to fight the Ebola outbreak will ... time-consuming the production of pharmaceuticals can be, according ... said that while some may be taken aback ... those with industry knowledge are well aware of ...
(Date:10/20/2014)... VIENNA , October 20, 2014 ... of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders and the delivery of care ... liver diseases and worrying inequalities in the provision of ... survey, which was commissioned by United European Gastroenterology (UEG), ... greater political and public awareness of the burden of ...
(Date:10/20/2014)... (PRWEB) October 20, 2014 ... Partners LLC, announced today that Ellen Teplitzky, an ... support for the pharmaceutical industry, has joined the ... of its legal services practice. NDA Partners ... expert witness and testimony, to top law firms ...
(Date:10/19/2014)... , Oct. 19, 2014 NextCODE Health, which enables ... genome in real time, today announced the launch of its ... Exchange , at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) ... learn more, sign up and apply for free beta access, ... features and benefits can be viewed here . ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Kalorama: ZMapp Highlights Need For Faster Biopharmaceutical Production 2Kalorama: ZMapp Highlights Need For Faster Biopharmaceutical Production 3Major Survey Reveals Changing Trends and Inequalities in Healthcare Provision for Gastrointestinal Disorders Across Europe 2Major Survey Reveals Changing Trends and Inequalities in Healthcare Provision for Gastrointestinal Disorders Across Europe 3Major Survey Reveals Changing Trends and Inequalities in Healthcare Provision for Gastrointestinal Disorders Across Europe 4Major Survey Reveals Changing Trends and Inequalities in Healthcare Provision for Gastrointestinal Disorders Across Europe 5NDA Partners Appoints Ellen Teplitzky, JD as Director of its Legal Services Practice 2The NextCODE Exchange: The first global, real-time system for sharing full-resolution genomic data 2The NextCODE Exchange: The first global, real-time system for sharing full-resolution genomic data 3
Cached News: