Blood vessels found to signal chain of destruction in bone diseases

Biologists at Washington University in St. Louis have discovered a mechanism in blood vessels that opens the door for bone loss in such diseases as rheumatoid arthritis, periodontal disease, osteoporosis, tumor-associated bone loss, or artificial implant loosening.

Patricia Collin-Osdoby, Ph.D., research associate professor of biology in Arts & Sciences at Washington University, and Philip Osdoby, Ph.D., professor of biology in Arts & Sciences, and Linda Rothe, Washington University research associate, have for the first time shown that blood vessels at inflamed sites where bone loss is occurring create signals that set into motion a cascade of events leading to local bone destruction.

When an area of tissue in or near bone becomes inflamed, key molecules called cytokines are locally produced and increase in the bloodstream. Studying human tissue and cell samples, the Osdobys have shown that two key inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF), signal the endothelial cells of blood vessels and capillaries to make and display on their cell surface a molecule called RANKL. RANKL is the critical signal that tells the body to make and activate bone-degrading cells called osteoclasts. After osteoclasts take bone away, osteoblasts go back in and add new bone. Normally, this bone remodeling, which is associated with a blood vessel or capillary at such sites, is a carefully balanced process. However, in persons with inflammatory bone disease, osteoclasts out-number and out-work the bone-forming osteoblasts, leading to weakened bone matrix, bone loss, and an increased risk of fracture. The Osdobys believe that inflamed blood vessels beckon cells to the region, and then initiate their development into highly active bone-degrading osteoclasts.

The researchers also found that in this biochemical chain of events, the blood vessels themselves make an antagonist molecule, osteoprotegerin (OPG), whic

Contact: Tony Fitzpatrick
Washington University in St. Louis

Page: 1 2 3 4

Related biology news :

1. Blood pressure hormone may inhibit growth of lung cancer
2. Blood tests identify patients on dialysis at high risk for death from cardiovascular disease
3. Blood banking systems improving in China, more progress needed
4. Blood proteins tied to inflammation
5. Bloodworms way with copper likely provides paradigm for new materials
6. Blood markers may reflect newborns potential of contracting HIV
7. Blood stem cells carry targeted genes
8. Blood vessels trigger development of the pancreas
9. Blood markers associated with autism and mental retardation
10. Blood test for diagnosing schizophrenia
11. Blood pressure-lowering DASH diet also reduces homocysteine

Post Your Comments:

(Date:5/16/2017)... , May 16, 2017   Bridge ... health organizations, and MD EMR Systems , ... development partner for GE, have established a partnership ... Portal product and the GE Centricity™ products, including ... EMR. These new integrations will ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... The global military biometrics market ... by the presence of several large global players. The ... major players - 3M Cogent, NEC Corporation, M2SYS Technology, ... 61% of the global military biometric market in 2016. ... military biometrics market boast global presence, which has catapulted ...
(Date:4/13/2017)... April 13, 2017 UBM,s Advanced Design and ... will feature emerging and evolving technology through its 3D ... will run alongside the expo portion of the event ... and demonstrations focused on trending topics within 3D printing ... and manufacturing event will take place June 13-15, 2017 at ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... Proscia ... be hosting a Webinar titled, “Pathology is going digital. Is your lab ready?” ... pathology adoption best practices and how Proscia improves lab economics and realizes an ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... and LAGUNA HILLS, Calif. , Oct. ... Cancer Research, London (ICR) and University ... SKY92, SkylineDx,s prognostic tool to risk-stratify patients with multiple myeloma ... MUK nine . The University of Leeds ... partly funded by Myeloma UK, and ICR will perform the ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... A new study published in ... and fresh in vitro fertilization (IVF) transfer cycles. The multi-center matched ... , After comparing the results from the fresh and frozen transfer cohorts, the ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... CALIF. (PRWEB) , ... October 10, 2017 , ... San ... part of its corporate rebranding initiative announced today. The bold new look is ... reach, as the company moves into a significant growth period. , It will also ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: