HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Boston chemist wins national award for research with enzymes, antibiotics

Christopher T. Walsh of Boston will be honored March 25 by the world's largest scientific society for his broad-ranging insights into how the enzymes of organisms drive chemical reactions, including how the antibiotic of last resort, vancomycin, can be defeated by bacterial enzymes. He will receive the 2003 Alfred Bader Award in Bioorganic Chemistry from the American Chemical Society at its national meeting in New Orleans.

In more than 35 years of research Walsh has studied a variety of enzymes, a class of proteins in humans and other organisms that orchestrate the breakdown of food, the assembly of hormones, the coagulation of blood, and the processing of neurological signals and many other functions.

"We're interested in what enzymes actually do, how they do it, what goes wrong and whether we can fix it," said Walsh, a biological chemist and professor at Harvard Medical School. About one-third of human diseases start with some malfunction in one of the body's thousands of enzymes.

Most recently his research team has focused on antibiotics, drugs that fight bacterial infections by selectively blocking bacterial enzymes while leaving human ones alone. For example, vancomycin kills bacteria by inhibiting their enzymes' ability to stitch together their cell walls.

In the early 1990s Walsh and his group discovered and characterized how some bacteria were able to evolve resistance to vancomycin's action -- by changing the shape of their strands of cell wall. Their fundamental insights have helped drug companies design new variants of vancomycin, some of which are now in human trials.

Walsh, who originally planned to go to medical school after college, was an undergraduate researcher in the laboratory of Konrad Bloch when he won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1964 for his cholesterol research. "I'm sure that had something to do with my deciding I liked research better," Walsh said.

One year later he received h
'"/>

Contact: Allison Byrum
a_byrum@acs.org
202-872-4400
American Chemical Society
4-Mar-2003


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Springtime blooms seen earlier now than in the past, say Boston University biologists
2. Childrens Hospital Boston receives more than $10 million to help make smallpox vaccine safer
3. NIH funds new Boston College-Boston University study of B-1a cell associated with leukemia
4. The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology meets in Boston
5. Boston chemist wins national award for protein research
6. Tufts civil engineer predicts Bostons rising sea levels could cause billions of dollars in damage
7. Childrens Hospital Boston researchers regenerate zebrafish heart muscle
8. Microorganisms are cleaning up Boston Harbor, UMass study finds
9. Highlights of American Chemical Societys national meeting in Boston
10. Childrens Hospital Boston researchers use therapeutic cloning to create functional tissue in cows
11. Study by Boston College chemistry team shows critical role of water in protein function

Post Your Comments:
(Date:4/17/2014)... honored Clemson professor Rajendra Singh Thursday as a ... and expand solar deployment in the residential, commercial ... Banks Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and ... considered a local hero leading the charge across ... in solar power and driving policy changes at ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... the Amazon help create tinderbox conditions for wildfires ... forest loss during drought years, according to a ... in the Amazon could reach a "tipping point" ... to large-scale loss of trees, making recovery more ... Penn State. , "We documented one of the ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... a stark warning on the possible effects of gases ... 32 times that of carbon dioxide. Now a team ... as fully regenerable electron acceptors which helps explain why ... of being released to the atmosphere. However, there are ... enter into a vicious cycle to release large amounts ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):White House honors Clemson professor as 'Champion of Change' for solar deployment 2Drought and fire in the Amazon lead to sharp increases in forest tree mortality 2Drought and fire in the Amazon lead to sharp increases in forest tree mortality 3Methane climate change risk suggested by proof of redox cycling of humic substances 2
(Date:1/14/2014)... MA (PRWEB) January 14, 2014 iLab Solutions, ... Detwiler as the new Director of Product Strategy. In this ... well as iLab sub-teams to guide in the development of ... iLab provides the maximum possible benefit to the scientific community ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... 2014  RXi Pharmaceuticals Corporation (OTCQX: RXII), a biotechnology ... therapies addressing major unmet medical needs using RNA-targeted ... of Allowance from the United States Patent and ... (sd-rxRNA®), for the treatment of fibrosis. The patent ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... 2014   Kinaxis ®, provider of RapidResponse ®, a ... operations planning ( S&OP ) service, is proud to be ... will be held at the Hilton San Diego Bayfront, January ... Elisabeth Kaszas , Director of Supply Chain at Amgen, ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... 14, 2014 Kerr Corporation, a leading manufacturer ... additional how-to information about dual arch impressions on its dental ... Arch Impressions,” the blog entry serves up a list of ... a step-by-step demonstration by Dr. David Little as he crafts ...
Breaking Biology Technology:iLab Solutions Announces Michelle Detwiler as the New Director of Product Strategy 2RXi Pharmaceuticals Receives US Notice of Allowance for a Key Patent Relating to its Self-Delivering Technology with sd-rxRNAs targeting CTGF, including RXI-109, for the Treatment of Fibrotic Disorders 2RXi Pharmaceuticals Receives US Notice of Allowance for a Key Patent Relating to its Self-Delivering Technology with sd-rxRNAs targeting CTGF, including RXI-109, for the Treatment of Fibrotic Disorders 3Event Alert: Kinaxis Customer to Present at the Biomanufacturing Summit "Supply Chain: Improving Network Effectiveness" 2
Cached News: