HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Botanist explores fascinating world of plant resins and amber in comprehensive new book

SANTA CRUZ, CA--From the Stone Age to the present day, people have found a wide range of uses for plant resins and have been fascinated by amber, which is fossilized resin. Plant resins--sticky plant secretions that harden when exposed to air--have been used as medicines, fuels, varnishes, adhesives, and perfume ingredients, to mention just a few examples.

Jean Langenheim, professor emerita and research professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz, has been studying amber and resins for more than 40 years. Her investigations have covered every aspect of the subject, including the chemistry of resins, their geologic history, their roles in the ecology of the plants that produce them, and their many uses throughout human history.

Langenheim has now written a comprehensive book on plant resins that reflects the depth and breadth of her knowledge as well as her enthusiasm for these fascinating plant products. Plant Resins: Chemistry, Evolution, Ecology, and Ethnobotany, published in May by Timber Press, is the only up-to-date scientific reference book on the subject. It is richly illustrated with maps, color and black-and-white photos, and exquisite line drawings by UCSC alumnus Jesse Markman.

Langenheim first became interested in plant resins through her research on amber. In the early 1960s, as a research fellow at Harvard University, she conducted the first chemical analyses to determine the biological sources of amber. Although people had assumed that most amber came from the resins of pines and other conifers, Langenheim found that Mexican amber came from a tropical flowering tree. This discovery led her to conduct a comprehensive investigation of amber through geologic time, identifying the different kinds of trees that could have produced amber throughout the geologic record.

Langenheim's 1969 paper on amber in the journal Science became a classic and established her as the world's lea
'"/>

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz
21-May-2003


Page: 1 2 3 4

Related biology news :

1. Botanists discover new conifer species in Vietnam
2. Botanists collect, study rare Hawaiian plants
3. Study explores gene transfer to modify underlying course of Alzheimers disease
4. New research explores early bird and night owl sleep patterns
5. Parenting ethics panel explores thorny issues posed by technology
6. Study explores safety of low-dose radiation
7. Researcher explores tumors survival strategy
8. Symposium explores microbial forensics and the investigation of biocrimes
9. UT Southwestern scientist explores caffeine-signaling activity in brain function
10. Stanford explores new avenue for brain injury, paralysis research
11. Science editor explores the role of environmental change on global security

Post Your Comments:
(Date:7/24/2014)... species for food or commercial food sale, has been ... decline of many species of primates and other mammals. ... half of the species being consumed are birds, particularly ... only the meat made available for sale but the ... hunters and brought to villages for consumption, we noted ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... two factors that characterize sustainable university and college ... qualified physics teachers. Specifically, one or more faculty ... in combination with institutional motivation and commitment can ... Engineering and Math (STEM) teacher shortages are especially ... way for institutions seeking to increase the number ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... 24, 2014 Some sticky research out of York ... a certain species of toxic grass fungus: moose saliva ... Biology Letters , "Ungulate saliva inhibits a grassendophyte ... to red fescue grass (which hosts a fungus called ... slower fungus growth and less toxicity. , "Plants have ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Creating sustainable STEM teacher preparation programs 2Moose drool inhibits growth of toxic fungus: York U research 2
(Date:7/24/2014)... SAN DIEGO , July 24, 2014 /PRNewswire/ ... company, announced today the appointment of Adam ... (COO). Cypher Genomics provides rapid and comprehensive annotation ... discovery and clinical reporting. "Cypher,s technology ... to improve healthcare by enhancing diagnostic accuracy, optimizing ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... Diego, CA (PRWEB) July 24, 2014 ... the reporting of molecular diagnostic test results. It ... capabilities necessary for the validation and reporting of ... oncology. Molecular diagnostics is a rapidly growing area ... infectious disease, genetic predisposition, cancer, and companion diagnostics ...
(Date:7/23/2014)... Arab Emirates (UAE) (PRWEB) July 23, 2014 ... Century recently announced that its biobanking project, ... , Ph.D. to its growing Advisory Board. Scott ... very pleased to have Dr. Vaught onboard with Provia’s ... depth and expertise that Provia’s management team brings to ...
(Date:7/23/2014)... have made great strides in saving China,s endangered national ... over 65 giant panda reserves that have been established ... just 1596 pandas remain in the wild. , ... save the panda by improving genetic diversity, avoid inbreeding ... how are these high-profile programs doing so far? , ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Cypher Genomics Announces the Appointment of Adam Simpson as President and COO to Advance Transformative Genome Interpretation Technology 2Cypher Genomics Announces the Appointment of Adam Simpson as President and COO to Advance Transformative Genome Interpretation Technology 3New DNA-barcode Patent Virtually Eliminates False Test Results and Sample Mix-up 2Provia Laboratories Adds Dr. Jim Vaught, Ph.D., Former Chief of BBRB, to Advisory Board 2Provia Laboratories Adds Dr. Jim Vaught, Ph.D., Former Chief of BBRB, to Advisory Board 3Provia Laboratories Adds Dr. Jim Vaught, Ph.D., Former Chief of BBRB, to Advisory Board 4
Cached News: