HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Brain areas identified that 'decode' emotions of others

(Kingston, ON) Queen's psychologists have discovered that our ability to assess how other people are feeling relies on two specific areas of the brain.

The findings, published in the April issue of the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, are expected to have implications for the treatment of developmental disorders such as autism.

Led by Mark Sabbagh, the study is supported by a grant from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC). Also on the team, from the Queen's Psychology Department, are Margaret Moulson and Kate Harkness.

The study helps us understand the neural bases of everyday "theory of mind": our ability to explain behaviour in terms of mental states like intentions and desires. "What we're showing is that an important first step [in theory of mind] is being able to decode other people's mental states, and that this skill is carried out within a very specific neural pathway,"says Dr. Sabbagh.

The researchers used a technique called event-related potential.This involves fitting people with what looks like a hairnet containing 128 sponge electrodes that attach to their scalps and record electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. Images of eyes conveying different emotions (e.g. anger, sadness, embarrassment) are shown to the subjects, who are then asked to identify both the mental state and gender of the person in each picture, based solely on seeing that person's eyes.

By comparing the EEG signals associated with each response, the researchers identified two precise areas in the brain that were specifically activated when the participants made judgments about mental states: the medial temporal region and the orbital frontal cortex.

These "neural correlates" are already known to be associated with viewing emotional stimuli, such as a frightened face. Until now, however, there has been no evidence that their activation can be intentionally controlled.

"Our study shows that, not only will
'"/>

Contact: Nancy Dorrance
dorrance@post.queensuc.a
613-533-2869
Queen's University
15-Apr-2004


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Brain has center for detecting sound motion
2. Brains reward circuitry revealed in procrastinating primates
3. Brain serotonin enzyme finding might explain psychiatric disorders
4. Brain development and puberty may be key factors in learning disorders
5. Organization for Human Brain Mapping 2004 Annual Meeting
6. Brain disease research, particle physics meet in the middle (ware)
7. Brain control
8. Brain cells become more discriminating when they work together
9. Brain signal predicts working memory prowess
10. Brain Centre gives Wales a world lead
11. AAAS hosts Battle of the Brains to choose area student for international competition

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Brain areas identified that decode emotions others

(Date:7/29/2014)... from scientists at the University of Kent has shown ... are regulated a breakthrough that could have a ... from Kent,s School of Biosciences uncovered the mechanism whereby ... known as actin filaments are ,fine-tuned, to ... filaments appear to completely stable, providing a framework for ...
(Date:7/29/2014)... affects 1 in 100,000 people characterized by a loss ... remains unknown, a new study by a team of researchers ... Germany and other European institutions confirms for the first time ... 6 July in Nature Genetics , is an important ... a sphincter in the lower esophagus opens, allowing food to ...
(Date:7/28/2014)... Amundsen reached the South Pole in 1911, but new ... any human. , Using data from 16 ice cores ... including the South Pole, a group led by Joe ... Nevada, created the most accurate and precise reconstruction to ... new record, described in an article published today in ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Mysterious esophagus disease is autoimmune after all 2Lead pollution beat explorers to South Pole, persists today 2Lead pollution beat explorers to South Pole, persists today 3
(Date:7/29/2014)... , July 29, 2014 ... surgical equipment market (types, applications and geography) - Size, ... Report, Opportunities, Segmentation and Forecast, 2013 - 2020", suggests ... reach $12.1 billion by 2020 registering a CAGR of ... the breakthrough achieved by the electro surgical devices in ...
(Date:7/29/2014)... Hershey, PA & Rockville, MD (PRWEB) July 29, ... Immunomic Therapeutics, Inc. (ITI), a vaccine pioneer in ... the financial services firm Newport Coast Securities, Inc. ... , ITI is commercializing LAMP-vax technology, a breakthrough ... $25B+ vaccines and immunotherapy market. The company exclusively ...
(Date:7/29/2014)... DisasterTalk is a texting app which allows ... masts or other transmitters are down. The app can transmit ... the need for any Wi-Fi, and can also use a ... app has launched as a housing report finds ... risk of being affected by natural disasters. With the risk ...
(Date:7/29/2014)... California (PRWEB) July 29, 2014 The ... is a next generation approach to robotics. What sets ... is patent pending technology that allows them to communicate, ... all wirelessly over the internet. , “The invention is ... giving the little Droidles a life of their own, ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Global Surgical Equipment Market is expected to reach $12.1 billion by 2020 - Allied Market Research 2Global Surgical Equipment Market is expected to reach $12.1 billion by 2020 - Allied Market Research 3Immunomic Therapeutics Engages Newport Coast Securities, Inc. 2Immunomic Therapeutics Engages Newport Coast Securities, Inc. 3DisasterTalk App Could Save Lives as Report Reveals 8% of US Homes at Very High Risk of Natural Disaster 2Droidles, the Social Network of Robots and Open Source Platform for the Internet of Things, Launches for Crowd Funding on IndieGoGo.com 2
Cached News: