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Brain damage in autism: not what scientists once thought

Deepening the mystery of autism's origins, a Johns Hopkins Children's Center study has failed to link the typical autistic child's fixation on spinning objects and constant whirling around to long-suspected damage to the brain's control center for movement, balance and equilibrium.

Reporting in the December 2000 issue of the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, the Hopkins team said test results of parts of the cerebellum in 13 autistic children were the same as in normal children without autism.

The cerebellum has long been the focus of autism research because of the relentless responses autistic children make to sensory stimulation, according to Melissa Goldberg, Ph.D., assistant professor of child and adolescent psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center and the Kennedy Krieger Institute. "The stimulation we see autistic kids seeking out when they're spinning or putting things in front of their eyes would seem to be linked to the part of the brain known to control such things as our ability to stabilize our bodies and what we see and touch," she says. "But in this study we found this was not the case, at least not with the children with high-functioning autism."

Cautioning that their findings may not apply to all autistic children, Goldberg and her team added that they "still don't know what part of the brain is abnormal in autism."

In their study, the Hopkins researchers examined the eye movements of 13 high-functioning autistic children ages 7 to 17, after spinning them in a chair as they sat upright, tilting their heads forward just after the chair became still. If the cerebellum is functioning normally, the reflexive eye movements, which typically occur in the direction opposite to that in which the child spins, are diminished once the head is pitched forward. Researchers found the autistic children's eye reflexes diminished appropriately.

"This tells us that those parts of the cere
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Contact: Wendy Mullins
wmullins@jhmi.edu
410-223-1741
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
1-Jan-2001


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