HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Breakthroughs lead to better understanding in prevention of transfusion-transmitted infection

(SAN DIEGO, Calif., December 8, 2003) While the nation's blood supply is safe overall and there is a relatively small likelihood that transfusion recipients will acquire a transmitted disease, there are still risks involved when transferring one person's blood into another. The advent of new diseases, such as West Nile Virus (WNV), increases the need for further clinical vigilance and improved screening methods.

The blood supply is currently inspected in minipools with nucleic acid testing for HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV) and WNV, but there is now a movement toward screening individual blood donations with such examinations. Additionally, researchers are learning more about reducing the risk of transferring specific diseases that may not affect healthy individuals but may seriously hurt immunocompromised patients, who often receive donated blood. Several studies of this nature are being presented during the 45th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology.

"Modern medicine has contributed exponentially to the quality of medical care and has provided us with the opportunity to conduct successful blood transmissions to save millions of lives every year," said Stanley Schrier, M.D., President-Elect of the American Society of Hematology and Active Emeritus Professor of Medicine in the Division of Hematology at Stanford University School of Medicine. "However, it remains duly important that we not compromise our patients' overall well-being while trying to improve their situation."

Yield of West Nile Virus RNA Screening of U.S. Blood Donors (Abstract 190)

West Nile Virus (WNV) has spread rapidly in the United States over the past four years. In 2002, hospitals documented the first cases of WNV linked to blood transfusions, leading to an intense effort to develop and implement a screening program. Researchers from Blood Systems Laboratories, Tempe, Ariz., have introduced nuc
'"/>

Contact: Aimee Frank
amf@spectrumscience.com
202-955-6222
American Society of Hematology
8-Dec-2003


Page: 1 2 3 4 5

Related biology news :

1. Breakthroughs in acoustic tracking shine new light on the lives of fish
2. Advancing Biotechnology Breakthroughs
3. Nations Leading Biomedical Researchers Present Breakthroughs in Liver Disease
4. Environmental Technology Breakthroughs Forecast -- Year 2008
5. Lycopene slows human prostate tumour growth in mice and combined with vitamin E is even better
6. Microbes eat their way to better concrete
7. Computer database being developed at Temple will allow for better inventory of chemicals
8. New and better drugs for tuberculosis goal of UH professor
9. Ants protect plants better when jacked up on nectar
10. The blind really do hear better
11. Microarrays, key genome expression trackers, work better when probes are sequence-verified

Post Your Comments:
(Date:8/20/2014)... image of the Para and Mato Grosso states of ... set in order to deforest the land. Deforestation is ... where the land is thereafter converted to a nonforest ... farms, ranches, or urban use. The herringbone-patterned tan lines ... in the middle of the image are evidence of ...
(Date:8/20/2014)... Institutes of Health has awarded the Oklahoma Medical Research ... research on anthrax and the bacteria,s effects on humans. ... Ph.D., and his colleagues have studied the human immune ... Centers for Human Immunology. The original funding came soon ... the heels of the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, ...
(Date:8/20/2014)... sunscreen and seawater signals a relaxing trip to the ... beach vacation comes with an environmental hitch. When certain ... they can become toxic to some of the ocean,s ... other marine animals. Their study appears in the ACS ... Tovar-Sanchez and David Snchez-Quiles point out that other than ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):$14.5 million grant awarded to continue anthrax studies 2
(Date:8/20/2014)... (PRWEB) August 20, 2014 Not long ... E&L studies should be performed late in the development ... known. But current regulatory trends suggest that, like many ... the rise. In recent years, multiple drug sponsors have ... or address specific questions during phase I/II. It’s not ...
(Date:8/20/2014)... ear could improve the health of your heart, researchers ... Leeds used a standard TENS machine like those designed ... the tragus, the small raised flap at the front ... canal. , The stimulation changed the influence of the ... signals that can drive failing hearts too hard. , ...
(Date:8/20/2014)... GraphDB™ 6.0 from ... the enterprise replication cluster, faster loading speeds, higher ... Elasticsearch. This release happens to coincide with a ... GraphDB™ was formerly known as OWLIM. ... enterprise resilient RDF triplestore will also benefit from ...
(Date:8/19/2014)... August 19, 2014 Shimadzu Scientific ... systems, Prominence-i and Nexera-i, adding to the company’s ... excellent functionality, an intuitive operating environment, and full ... more efficient workflow for conventional to ultra-high-speed analysis. ... intuitive and intelligent design so users can begin ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Are Extractable and Leachables going Phase-Appropriate? New Webinar Hosted by Xtalks 2'Tickling' your ear could be good for your heart 2Ontotext Improves Its RDF Triplestore, GraphDB™ 6.0: Enterprise Resilience, Faster Loading Speeds and Connectors to Full-Text Search Engines Top the List of Enhancements 2Ontotext Improves Its RDF Triplestore, GraphDB™ 6.0: Enterprise Resilience, Faster Loading Speeds and Connectors to Full-Text Search Engines Top the List of Enhancements 3Ontotext Improves Its RDF Triplestore, GraphDB™ 6.0: Enterprise Resilience, Faster Loading Speeds and Connectors to Full-Text Search Engines Top the List of Enhancements 4Shimadzu’s New i-Series Integrated Liquid Chromatography Systems Provide Laboratories Wider Range of Analytical Capabilities 2Shimadzu’s New i-Series Integrated Liquid Chromatography Systems Provide Laboratories Wider Range of Analytical Capabilities 3
Cached News: