HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Changes to insect-seeking calls of horseshoe bats may drive new species formation

(Boston) -- It may not matter whether there is a mountain high enough or a river wide enough to keep members of a species apart. New species may diverge and form because of something as fundamental as a call to dine.

According to new research by Tigga Kingston, a research associate in the Department of Geography at Boston University, and Stephen Rossiter, a National Environment Research Council research fellow in the School of Biological Sciences at Queen Mary, University of London, geographical barriers may not be necessary for speciation. In their study of one species of bat in Southeast Asia, the scientists found that the bats were diverging into exclusive groups primarily because of acoustic differences in the calls they make to locate the insects they eat.

Their finding challenges long-standing theory that geographical barriers are the mechanism by which new species evolve. This new perspective on an old controversy appears in the June 10 issue of Nature.

For centuries, theorists have debated how new species form. Traditional thought holds that speciation occurs over long periods of time as a result of interbreeding among members of a group that are, for one reason or another, isolated from other members of the same population.

If, for example, geologic activity changed an area so that mountains rose and split a region populated by a species of bat, the bat populations on either side of a mountain would no longer be able to breed together. Their genetic information, including changes that lead to physical or behavioral adaptations to the demands of their environments, would no longer be pooled. Future generations of bats found on one side of the mountain would begin to diverge genetically from those on the opposite side. Eventually, the two populations of the bat species would become sufficiently different to qualify as separate species.

In their study, Kingston and Rossiter found that large-eared horseshoe b
'"/>

Contact: Ann Marie Menting
amenting@bu.edu
617-358-1240
Boston University
11-Jun-2004


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Changes in shape of single protein plays key role in the spread of cancer cells
2. Changes in arctic ice affect life around the globe
3. Changes in jet stream, storm tracks, linked to prairie drought patterns, study finds
4. Changes in prevalence of mutations associated with HIV treatment failure
5. Changes in rainfall patterns spur plant growth, carbon absorption across U.S.
6. Changes in agricultural practices help clean up Lake Erie
7. Changes in Lake Erie fish population suggest lakes recovery
8. Changes in Australian ecosystems tied to arrival of exotic animals
9. Changes in North American land use have had major impact on global environment
10. Changes in diet related to prevalence of asthma and allergies
11. Changes for chickens? New hybrid corn helps reduce phosphorus in poultry litter, UD scientists report

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/11/2017)... 2017 Research and Markets has announced the ... to their offering. ... eye tracking market to grow at a CAGR of 30.37% during ... Market 2017-2021, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis ... and its growth prospects over the coming years. The report also ...
(Date:4/6/2017)... 6, 2017 Forecasts by Product ... Readers, by End-Use (Transportation & Logistics, Government & Public ... & Fossil Generation Facility, Nuclear Power), Industrial, Retail, Business ... Are you looking for a definitive report on ... ...
(Date:4/5/2017)... April 4, 2017 KEY FINDINGS ... expand at a CAGR of 25.76% during the forecast ... the primary factor for the growth of the stem ... https://www.reportbuyer.com/product/4807905/ MARKET INSIGHTS The global stem cell ... application, and geography. The stem cell market of the ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... At ... Purple announced Dr. Suneel I. Sheikh, the co-founder, CEO and chief research scientist ... has been selected for membership in ARCS Alumni Hall of Fame . ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... , Oct. 11, 2017  VMS BioMarketing, a leading provider ... nationwide oncology Clinical Nurse Educator (CNE) network, which will launch ... for communication among health care professionals to enhance the patient ... office staff, and other health care professionals to help women ... cancer. ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... SAN DIEGO, CALIF. (PRWEB) , ... October 10, 2017 , ... ... website as part of its corporate rebranding initiative announced today. The bold new ... broaden its reach, as the company moves into a significant growth period. , It ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... SANTA CRUZ, Calif. , Oct. 10, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... SBIR grant from the NIH to develop RealSeq®-SC (Single ... preparation kit for profiling small RNAs (including microRNAs) from ... Cell Analysis Program highlights the need to accelerate development ... "New techniques for ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: