HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Dose of PTEN protein found to determine progression of prostate cancer

NEW YORK, NY October 27 - In patients with prostate cancer, one change that can be seen at the molecular level is the loss of the PTEN tumor suppressor gene, a gene responsible for restricting cell proliferation. One or both copies of the PTEN gene are found to have been lost in 70 percent of prostate cancer patients at the time of diagnosis. It has generally been believed that one remaining copy would still protect against tumor progression to advanced metastatic cancer.

But now, for the first time, scientists at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center have established mouse models for prostate cancer that have varying "doses" or amounts of Pten protein produced from the remaining gene. Their results show that the activity of the single Pten gene does not necessarily protect against prostate cancer. Instead, the dose determines whether the tumor will become either an aggressive cancer or take a slow path towards microscopic features of growth, but remain benign. This new understanding of the natural history of the disease could allow researchers to develop novel clinical strategies to diagnose, treat, and possibly prevent prostate cancer. This article will appear both as HTML and in print in the December 23, 2003 issue of the new, open access journal published by the Public Library of Science. It appears in PDF form online as a pre-issue publication on October 27, 2003 at www.plosbiology.org.

"We have shown that prostate cancer development is not just affected by mutation and loss of the PTEN gene but that its progression is dose-dependent on the PTEN protein, which we have measured for the first time," said Pier Paolo Pandolfi, M.D., Ph.D., Head of the Molecular and Developmental Biology Laboratory at Memorial Sloan-Kettering and the study's senior author. "Two men, each with one PTEN gene left, could have totally different disease outcomes depending on the actual dose of PTEN protein coming from that ge
'"/>

Contact: Joanne Nicholas
mediastaff@mskcc.org
212-639-3573
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
27-Oct-2003


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. New molecular link key to cellular proteins involved in cancer progression, other diseases
2. Researchers identify protein promoting vascular tumor growth
3. UCI scientists successfully target key HIV protein; breakthrough may lead to new drug therapies
4. Experimental drug shown to block mutant protein causing blood disease
5. Loss of the neuronal adhesion protein d-catenin leads to severe cognitive dysfunction
6. Images of tail of protein needed for cell multiplication suggest anticancer drug targets
7. New dye directly reveals activated proteins in living cells
8. Disruption of protein-folding causes neurodegeneration, mental retardation
9. A new protein is discovered to play a key role in cancer progression
10. Optimizing proteins death domain halts leukemia in laboratory study
11. Stuck on you: Scientists lay bare secrets of bacterial attachment proteins

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:5/16/2019)... ... ... In a FDA-contracted Standard Coordinating Body Workshop held at the ... Asymmetrex founder and director James L. Sherley, M.D., Ph.D. predicted a sea ... cells. Many of the gathered participants dismissed this idea. Few argued against ...
(Date:5/14/2019)... ... May 13, 2019 , ... BioMedGPS is ... very special Pre-EWMA 2019 event at Gothenburg’s Universeum Aquarium. Guests will be treated ... Innovations in Advanced Wound Care. , SmartTRAK’s Advanced Wound Care Experts will serve ...
(Date:5/8/2019)... ... May 08, 2019 , ... ... that business professional Carol S. Mann has agreed to serve as Chief Executive ... and Chief Operating Officer, effective immediately. They will join Chairman and Founder Roger ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/2/2019)... ... May 02, 2019 , ... ... company, will present results documenting discrepancies between U.S. insurer policies for genetic testing ... at risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). , Jill ...
(Date:4/25/2019)... ... April 23, 2019 , ... Frank is an albino, deaf Great Dane. His owners rescued ... due to his health issues. Despite his hearing impairment, he was always an active and ... would play all day, every day. As the two grew, playtime became rougher and Frank ...
(Date:4/18/2019)... ... April 18, 2019 , ... Taking a step closer to ... engineer at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a novel process using an ... isobutanol and other biofuels more economically. , Isobutanol, like ethanol, is an alcohol, ...
(Date:4/16/2019)... , ... April 16, 2019 , ... ... systems, applications, and technology, today announced that Bank South Pacific (BSP), the largest ... RFP process. The bank awarded Fulcrum a contract to deliver a fingerprint-based Know ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: