HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Drug breaks for HIV-infected individuals may put certain immune cells at risk

DALLAS May 2, 2002 Disruption of antiretroviral therapy by patients infected with HIV may be putting certain T-cells in their bloodstream at greater risk for infection with the deadly virus if it is allowed to rebound, a study in the May 2 issue of the journal Nature concludes.

Patients whose viral counts have fallen to nearly imperceptible levels sometimes interrupt antiviral therapy temporarily, re-starting treatment if viral levels rebound. Called structured therapy interruption, these drug breaks can increase the number of certain HIV-fighting T-cells, called CD8 T-cells, in the blood. Another type of T-cell, CD4, also plays an important role in fighting HIV.

Using data collected at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, researchers have found that, even though CD8 cells increase in number with interruption of therapy, HIV-specific CD4 cells appear to be particularly prone to infection by the virus during treatment interruption. Infections of CD4 cells hasten their destruction and help spread the disease to other cells in the body.

In time, as the patients immune system is progressively weakened, this can give rise to full-blown AIDS, researchers say.

The patient can begin taking antiviral drugs to control the virus again, although this therapy is not a cure. It is unknown how long it takes for the body to regenerate these HIV-specific CD4 cells once the bodys supply has become infected, or even if regeneration occurs with re-initiation of anti-viral treatment.

During the treatment interruption, although HIV-fighting CD8 cells increase, HIV-specific CD4 cells also become infected if the virus is allowed to rebound, said Dr. Joseph Casazza, a co-author and assistant professor of infectious disease at UT Southwestern. In effect, by taking a drug break, you could be robbing Peter to pay Paul.


'"/>

Contact: Mindy Baxter
melinda.baxter@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center
1-May-2002


Page: 1

Related biology news :

1. Cigarette smoke causes breaks in DNA and defects to a cells chromosomes, Pitt study finds
2. New model explains why costly insect outbreaks hard to predict
3. Spruce bark beetle outbreaks examined at Alaska Symposium
4. Ebola outbreaks are simultaneous mini-epidemics
5. Mustard-root map breaks new ground tracking gene expression
6. $51 million research facility, classroom complex breaks ground at UH
7. Some 400 fragile regions of genome more vulnerable to evolutionary breaks
8. System failure to blame for Walkerton, North Battleford outbreaks, says U of T study
9. As Vitamin B-6 levels go down, numbers of DNA strand breaks go up
10. Checkpoint protein blocks chromosome breaks at fragile sites
11. Insect infestation models may shed light on insect and disease outbreaks

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:2/21/2017)... PORTLAND, Ore. , Feb. 22, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... of Companies (Avamere Health Services, Infinity Rehab, Signature Hospice, ... study that will apply the power of IBM cognitive ... and health centers. By analyzing data streaming from sensors ... into physical and environmental conditions, and obtain deeper learnings ...
(Date:2/16/2017)... , Feb. 16, 2017  Genos, a community ... that it has received Laboratory Accreditation from the ... is presented to laboratories that meet stringent requirements ... scientifically rigorous processes. "Genos is committed ... laboratory practices. We,re honored to be receiving CAP ...
(Date:2/13/2017)... SAN FRANCISCO , Feb. 13, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... a centralized platform that is designed to enhance ... the latest release in the RSA Fraud & ... to enable organizations to leverage additional insights from ... anti-fraud tools to better protect their customers from ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:3/22/2017)... , March 22, 2017   Boston Biomedical ... cancer therapeutics designed to target cancer stemness pathways, today ... S. Andrews as Chief Executive Officer, effective April ... Chiang J. Li , M.D., FACP, who has ... years ago. Under his leadership, Boston Biomedical has grown ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... ... March 21, 2017 , ... Premier executive recruitment firm, Slone Partners, ... Firm by Hunt Scanlon Media. , Hunt Scanlon Media is one of ... referenced global news source in the human capital sector. , “It is a great ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... ... March 21, 2017 , ... Proper glycosylation is critical ... desired increase and/or decrease in antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity or complement-dependent cytotoxicity, there is ... antibodies. , To meet this demand, the team at SCIEX has developed ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... ... March 21, 2017 , ... Aqua Design Innovations (ADI) ... and raising over $30,000 in the first 40 minutes of crowdfunding. EcoQube is ... fast, easy, and affordably, anywhere. , “Simply add fertilized water and in less ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: