HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Duke Researchers Discover Candidate Susceptibility Gene For Autoimmune Disease

ls that had similar clinical signs, the researchers hypothesized the animals were producing too much of a potent inflammatory protein called tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFa).
To test their idea, the researchers injected the TTP-deficient animals with an antibody that neutralizes TNFa. In a dramatic and almost complete reversal, all signs of disease completely disappeared.

The findings support preliminary results of human clinical trials being conducted at Duke and other research institutions of an experimental treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that also uses antibodies to TNFa, Blackshear said. Such studies have shown antibodies to TNFa can significantly reduce the symptoms of RA in patients.

"We know that TNFa is involved in many human inflammatory diseases including autoimmune disorders and septic shock," Blackshear said. "This finding provides insight into a new gene that appears to regulate TNFa. It is possible that defects in this gene may cause people to be susceptible to developing autoimmune diseases."

The corresponding gene has been identified in people, and Blackshear's group will soon begin a study to see if mutations in the gene correlate with autoimmune disease in people.

"The TTP-deficient mouse is an exciting new model of arthritis," said Haynes, chairman of medicine at Duke and director of the Duke University Arthritis Center. "It also provides important new information about the types of genes that can cause arthritis."

In addition to using the animal model to understand the autoimmune response, Blackshear will continue studies to determine how TTP is involved in the insulin response.

"Right now we really don't have a good handle on what TTP is doing, although there are hints it is involved in gene regulation," Blackshear said. "Our next step will be to determine if it is involved in synthesis or degradation of TNF_ and then move forward to our original question of how TTP i
'"/>

Contact: Karyn Hede George
georg016@mc.duke.edu
919-660-1301
Duke University
14-May-1996


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Researchers determine genetic cause of Timothy syndrome
2. Researchers find color sensitive atomic switch in bacteria
3. Researchers identify protein promoting vascular tumor growth
4. Researchers devise potent new tools to curb ivory poaching
5. Researchers create nanotubes that change colors, form nanocarpet and kill bacteria
6. Researchers ID chlorophyll-regulating gene
7. Researchers develop fast track way to discover how cells are regulated
8. Researchers identify distinctive signature for metastatic prostate cancer
9. Researchers report new gene test for isolated cleft lip and palate
10. Researchers discover why mutant gene causes colon cancer
11. Researchers identify the genomes controlling elements

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/11/2017)... DUBLIN , Apr. 11, 2017 Research ... Tracking Market 2017-2021" report to their offering. ... The global eye tracking market to grow at ... The report, Global Eye Tracking Market 2017-2021, has been prepared based ... report covers the market landscape and its growth prospects over the ...
(Date:4/6/2017)... April 6, 2017 Forecasts by ... Document Readers, by End-Use (Transportation & Logistics, Government & ... Gas & Fossil Generation Facility, Nuclear Power), Industrial, Retail, ... Are you looking for a definitive report ... ...
(Date:4/5/2017)... 2017 KEY FINDINGS The global ... a CAGR of 25.76% during the forecast period of ... factor for the growth of the stem cell market. ... MARKET INSIGHTS The global stem cell market is ... geography. The stem cell market of the product is ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 11, 2017 , ... ... pathology, announced today it will be hosting a Webinar titled, “Pathology is going ... Pathology Associates , on digital pathology adoption best practices and how Proscia improves ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... LAGUNA HILLS, Calif. , Oct. 11, 2017 ... London (ICR) and University of ... prognostic tool to risk-stratify patients with multiple myeloma (MM), in ... nine . The University of Leeds ... by Myeloma UK, and ICR will perform the testing services ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... A new ... rates in frozen and fresh in vitro fertilization (IVF) transfer cycles. ... to IVF success. , After comparing the results from the fresh and frozen ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... , ... October 10, 2017 , ... San Diego-based team ... its corporate rebranding initiative announced today. The bold new look is part of ... the company moves into a significant growth period. , It will also expand its ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: