HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
End of 'free ride' on ecosystem CO2 absorption

DURHAM, N.C. -- According to a new study, the world may soon see the end of the "free ride," in which carbon absorption by natural ecosystems ameliorates the rise in atmospheric CO2 due to fossil fuel burning and loss of forest.

The precise ecosystem study of the reaction of a Texas grassland to a range of carbon dioxide levels has shown that soil nitrogen availability may limit the capacity of ecosystems to absorb expected increases in atmospheric CO2. The researchers said their study emphasizes the urgency with which the U.S. and other nations should adopt stringent limitations on CO2 emissions, as outlined in the international Kyoto accord on climate change.

The researchers, led by Duke University ecologist Robert Jackson and USDA Agricultural Research Service researchers Wayne Polley, and Hyrum Johnson, published their findings in the May 16, 2002, Nature. First author of the study is Richard Gill, a former Duke postdoctoral associate, now a faculty member at Washington State University. The research was supported by the Department of Energy and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

"Based on fossil fuel emissions, the carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere should be going up twice as fast as it currently is," said Jackson. "However, natural systems such as the regrowing Eastern forests are currently taking up that extra carbon dioxide, so we're really getting a free ride now.

"Many of us, myself included, believe that this free ride won't continue to the same extent that it has, because the incremental benefits of the extra CO2 get smaller and smaller relative to other nutrient constraints," he said. The policy implications of their findings are apparent, said Jackson.

"Considering the expected population increase, greater resource use per capita and the inability of natural systems to take up CO2, we may well be looking at increases per year that are double what they are now, with atmospheric CO2 concentrations as high as 8
'"/>

Contact: Dennis Meredith
dennis.meredith@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University
15-May-2002


Page: 1 2 3 4

Related biology news :

1. OHSU researcher publishes first measurements of free-base nicotine in cigarette smoke
2. Carnegie Mellon researcher tests tools for protecting Anacostia River ecosystem from PCBs
3. Gulf of Maine marine ecosystem may have entered new phase
4. Pocket gophers serve as ecosystem engineers
5. New study to investigate demise of coral reef ecosystems
6. Study probes ecosystem of tree holes
7. All ecosystems are equally productive under drought conditions
8. Catastrophic shift in species diversity and productivity of an ecosystem
9. Biological oceanographers examine regime shifts in complex marine ecosystems
10. Freeing Nemo: Aquarium owners releasing non-native fish could endanger marine ecosystems
11. Pollution history documented through shell remains provides tool to study ecosystem change

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:5/24/2019)... ... May 24, 2019 , ... The newest edition of ... available on the company’s global website. , Crystallography Times is a monthly electronic newsletter ... It serves the X-ray analysis community by presenting the latest news and crystallographic research. ...
(Date:5/21/2019)... ... May 21, 2019 , ... If a genetically or ... can we tell it apart from the millions of microorganisms that exist naturally ... team, including Eric Young , assistant professor of chemical engineering at Worcester ...
(Date:5/21/2019)... ... May 20, 2019 , ... The ASGCT Clinical Trials ... and cell therapy throughout the United States. Data curated daily from ClinicalTrials.gov ensures the ... , ASGCT members who volunteered to assist in the development of the ASGCT ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/11/2019)... ... June 11, 2019 , ... Veterinary Regenerative Medicine company, ... has announced that their GMP facility for cell production is now approved by ... This is an important milestone for VetStem as it expands into contract cell ...
(Date:5/31/2019)... ... May 30, 2019 , ... World Compliance Seminars today ... 08-09, 2019 in Boston, MA. This peer recommended interactive workshop is always selected ... training will kick off with a compendial treatment of Data Integrity fundamentals. After ...
(Date:5/15/2019)... ... ... Milton Hershey School® has named William Charles Ballough Harding ’78 the 2019 Alumnus ... is changing lives by creating solutions to global healthcare challenges through the development of ... founders – Milton and Catherine Hershey – who always hoped for Milton Hershey School ...
(Date:5/7/2019)... , ... May 06, 2019 , ... ... resource for the growing number of repositories being asked to store cellular products ... to the team of contributors who are world leaders, who have shared their ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: