HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Endometriosis: Could angiostatic therapy be the new treatment of the future?

Berlin, Germany: Chemicals that inhibit the development of new blood vessels could prove to be a new way of treating endometriosis, according to research from The Netherlands and the USA presented today (Monday 28 June) at the 20th annual meeting of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology.

However, the researchers warned that the work is still at an early stage, with the current investigations taking place in mice, so it would be a few years before the findings could translate into improved treatments for women with the disease.

Endometriosis is a disease of the lining tissue of the womb. It can be very painful and can have a serious impact on the lives of women. At present, there is no satisfactory treatment or cure for the condition, which affects between 10-25% of women of reproductive age1.

Annemiek Nap, a doctor at the University Hospital Maastricht, The Netherlands, told the conference that she and her colleagues tested whether angiostatic therapy (therapy that inhibits the development of blood vessels) could prevent new endometriosis lesions growing and whether it could interfere with the maintenance and growth of existing lesions.

They used four angiostatic compounds: anti-human vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-hVGF), TNP-470, endostatin and anginex. They tested the compounds on human endometrium that had been transplanted into 49 mice and allowed to grow into endometriotic lesions. "We thought that using human endometrium would make the model as close to the human situation as possible," said Ms Nap.

"We found that angiostatic therapy inhibits the number of newly developed blood vessels around lesions. However, the mature vessels, which are protected by smooth muscle cells, were not inhibited. We also observed that the number of endometriotic lesions in mice treated with angiostatic agents was lower than the number of endometriotic lesions in mice not treated with angiostatic agents."
'"/>

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@blueprintpartners.be
European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology
28-Jun-2004


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Could mice hold the secret to longer life?
2. Could vitamins raise levels of bad cholesterol? Animal study suggests they might
3. Could memory performance and spatial learning be genetically based?
4. Could a specific protein contribute to erectile dysfunction for the diabetic and obese?
5. Could diabetes treatments fight cancer?
6. Could rice be the source for a natural herbicide?
7. Could hibernators hold the key to improving organ preservation?
8. Could Bt transgenic crops have nutritionally favourable effects on insects?
9. Could one less cookie a day help the fight against fat?
10. Could an anti-marijuana compound hold the key to body weight and appetite control?
11. Study finds genetic aberrations linked to lung cancer; Could help in early diagnosis

Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/15/2014)... the 44th Rosenstiel Award for Distinguished Work in Biomedical ... the mechanisms of genomic instability and its implications for ... second alumnus to win the Rosenstiel Award; the first, ... Alt is the Charles A. Janeway Professor of Pediatrics ... an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at ...
(Date:10/14/2014)... shows SIRT6—a protein known to inhibit the growth ... skin cancers by turning on an enzyme that increases ... Previously considered protective, SIRT6 is part of a family ... stability and prevent some of the genetic flaws associated ... lead to cancer. This study, in the journal,s October ...
(Date:10/14/2014)... of the planet,s leading questions is how to produce ... variable climate. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the ... over the next 40 years to feed a growing ... the necessary rise in food production. Plants—grains, cereals, ... supporting livestock. Current research must tap into our ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Brandeis awards 44th Rosenstiel Award to pioneering geneticist Fred Alt 2Two-faced gene: SIRT6 prevents some cancers but promotes sun-induced skin cancer 2Building a bridge from basic botany to applied agriculture 2Building a bridge from basic botany to applied agriculture 3
(Date:10/22/2014)... YORK , Oct. 22, 2014 Nuvilex, ... Federation, approximately 400 million people worldwide are living with ... million people by 2030.  The global market for diabetes ... 2012 approximately 330,000 people worldwide died from pancreatic cancer.  ... death due to cancer in the United ...
(Date:10/22/2014)... and HONG KONG , Oct. ... disease therapeutics enterprise, announced today that rare disease expert ... as vice president, research. Dr. McKew brings more than ... leadership positions at the National Institutes of Health, Wyeth ... by Wyeth). Dr. McKew will lead aTyr,s efforts to expand ...
(Date:10/20/2014)... YORK , Oct. 20, 2014 ... their experimental ZMapp™ antibody therapeutic to fight the ... how difficult and time-consuming the production of pharmaceuticals ... market research publisher said that while some may ... of this compound, those with industry knowledge are ...
(Date:10/20/2014)... , Oct. 20, 2014 Asterias ... the Company has signed a Notice of Grant ... Medicine (CIRM), effective October 1, 2014.  The NGA ... payments and the release of additional grant funds ... grant award for clinical development of Asterias, product, ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Nuvilex Brief Analyst Report: Thinking Outside the Box by BrokerBank Securities, Inc. 2aTyr Pharma Appoints John C. McKew, Ph.D., as Vice President, Research 2aTyr Pharma Appoints John C. McKew, Ph.D., as Vice President, Research 3Kalorama: ZMapp Highlights Need For Faster Biopharmaceutical Production 2Kalorama: ZMapp Highlights Need For Faster Biopharmaceutical Production 3Asterias Biotherapeutics Announces Notice of Grant Award with CIRM for Phase 1/2a Clinical Trial of AST-OPC1 in Complete Cervical Spinal Cord Injury 2Asterias Biotherapeutics Announces Notice of Grant Award with CIRM for Phase 1/2a Clinical Trial of AST-OPC1 in Complete Cervical Spinal Cord Injury 3Asterias Biotherapeutics Announces Notice of Grant Award with CIRM for Phase 1/2a Clinical Trial of AST-OPC1 in Complete Cervical Spinal Cord Injury 4
Cached News: