HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Evolution boosted anti-cancer prowess of a primordial gene

Researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have looked back in evolutionary time and identified what may be a gene that was once only moderately effective in slowing down cellular reproduction, until it linked up with a more efficient set of genes to create a powerful anti-cancer response.

The gene, called Arf, was already known to have cancer-suppressing activity. Arf responds to cancer-causing environments by activating the well-known tumor suppressor gene, p53. In turn, p53 activates a battery of other genes to stop cell growth or, in extreme cases, to trigger cell death in response to a variety of harmful conditions, such as DNA damage or activation of oncogenes (cancer-causing genes). In fact, loss of Arf or p53 is a common event in many human cancers.

But the new results suggest that Arf plays a role far older in evolutionary terms than its more familiar job of stimulating p53 to prevent cancer. The St. Jude findings suggest that Arf originally evolved to slow the cell's metabolism and growth by limiting production of ribosomes. Ribosomes, made up of RNA (de-coded DNA) and proteins, guide the production of all other cellular proteins according to the genetic code. The new work shows that Arf interferes with production of the RNA components of ribosomes in order to exert some control of protein production and cell growth.

"About 80 percent of a cell's RNA is tied up in ribosomes," said Charles Sherr, M.D., Ph.D., a member of the Genetics & Tumor Cell Biology Department at St. Jude and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. "In fact, producing ribosomes is practically what cells do for a living. It's their major energy-consuming activity. So it makes sense that any limitation on ribosome production would slow cell growth."

Sherr's team believes that Arf counteracts excessive growth-promoting stimuli by interfering with ribosome production. But inhibiting ribosomal production isn't a particularly efficient way to control
'"/>

Contact: Bonnie Cameron
bonnie.cameron@stjude.org
901-495-4815
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
3-Mar-2003


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Evolution of whale hearing unfolds in fossil record
2. Evolutions mirror in a fishs spines
3. Evolutions twist
4. New Understanding Evolution Web site provides one-stop-shop for nations science teachers
5. Evolution caught in the act
6. Evolutionary Genomics meeting in Tucson
7. Evolution upset: Oxygen-making microbes came last, not first
8. Evolution: Driving Change
9. Evolution of language: FOXP2 and human uniqueness in religious perspective
10. Rutgers to host 14th annual Human Behavior and Evolution Society meeting
11. Evolutionary speed limit governs how quickly life bounces back after extinction

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:5/21/2020)... STONEHAM, Mass. (PRWEB) , ... May 21, 2020 ... ... innovative orthopedic care across the North Shore and Greater Boston area, is pleased ... experience. , As one of the busiest group practices in the area, Agility ...
(Date:5/14/2020)... N.J. (PRWEB) , ... May ... ... SIMPLY – a platform that helps Life Science Manufacturers accurately and easily ... LAUNCH," automating the development of Gross-to-Net models by projecting discounts/rebates to Commercial ...
(Date:5/14/2020)... (PRWEB) , ... May 14, 2020 , ... ... job board for medical sales representatives, found the 2019 average medical sales rep ... findings risk being shadowed by uncertainties amid the COVID-19 global crisis. , The ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/28/2020)... ... June 25, 2020 , ... With the COVID-19 pandemic ... drug treatment. In an effort to better understand the cellular responses to COVID-19, ... imaging dataset portraying therapeutic compound effects from over 1,600 approved and referenced molecules ...
(Date:6/23/2020)... ... June 22, 2020 , ... ... Amniosomes special offer. This includes buy three, get the fourth unit free with ... , Amniotic derived exosomes, known as exosomes, have been a game changer for ...
(Date:6/11/2020)... ... June 09, 2020 , ... PathSensors Inc., ... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program funded by the National Institute of Food ... in the Field”. The project’s goal was to engineer and develop a field-deployable ...
(Date:5/30/2020)... ... 29, 2020 , ... Medrio, Inc., the leading provider of ... enabled Cytovale, Inc., a medical technology company dedicated to revolutionizing diagnostics for conditions ... patient in (FPI) in just seven days. The Cytovale technology will allow patients ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: