HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Evolving slower gets you the bigger piece of the pie

A well known effect in the arms race that ensues between host and parasite, the red queen effect, states that the species that is able to evolve countermeasures faster than its partner will gain the upper hand. New research claims that this is not so when considering mutualistic interactions between species. When deciding who will gain most from the interaction, it pays to move slowly. The quickly evolving species then adapts to the slow evolver's needs.

Mutualistic interactions, in which species provide services to one another, are abundant in nature. Examples are everywhere: from the mitochondria, once free-living bacteria that provide energy from burning sugars with oxygen to every cell in our body, to fungi that enable plants to take up nitrogen from the soil, to ants interacting with caterpillars providing them with protection for food. When such an interaction occurs, who will benefit most? Will the ant benefit most by providing very little protection for a lot of food, or will the caterpillar benefit most by providing very little food for a lot of protection?

Michael Lachmann from the Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences in Leipzig and Carl Bergstrom from the University of Washington examined this question by using mathematical analysis. One can abstract the behavior of each species as being "generous" and giving much of the benefit to the other species, or being "selfish" and asking for most of the benefit for itself. In a mutualistic interaction, the two species benefit most from coordinating - when one is "generous" and the other "selfish". Benefits to each are less than optimal in other cases - when both are selfish, or both generous.

When the population of one species is all generous, and of the other all selfish, no evolutionary changes can occur, since no species can benefit from changing its behavior. When pairings of selfish-selfish or generous-generous occur in some cases, then evolutionary change might happe
'"/>

Contact: Michael Lachmann
lachmann@mis.mpg.de
49-341-995-9854
Max-Planck-Gesellschaft
17-Jan-2003


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Breast is still best, though breast-fed infants may show initial slower weight gain
2. When plants need ants help, bigger is better
3. Invasive marine animals get bigger
4. Growth hormone could make farm fish bigger, faster to market
5. Museums must play a bigger role in conservation
6. Climate plays bigger role than CO2 in make-up of plant communities
7. Genes play a bigger role in womens depression than in mens, twin study finds
8. New research shows plants can shuffle and paste gene pieces to generate genetic diversity
9. Building the whole cell from pieces
10. The dopamine receptor D1 gene and ADHD: A piece of the genetic puzzle?
11. Researchers find new piece of cell growth puzzle

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Evolving slower gets you the bigger piece the pie

(Date:10/19/2014)... India over the last 30 years contributed only ... during that time, according to a new study ... ., "Energy access is fundamental to development: it ... education, communication, and health," says IIASA researcher Shonali ... energy access is widely agreed to be an ...
(Date:10/17/2014)... in German . ... day in order to reproduce? And why are there two ... the latest issue of the research journal Molecular Human ... Steven Ramm from Bielefeld University Bielefeld has compiled this special ... for a female to copulate with several males in quick ...
(Date:10/16/2014)... and Washington land managers have a new synthesis of ... moist mixed-conifer (MMC) forests in the two states. ... in Eastern Oregon and Washington: A Synthesis of the ... a general technical report published by the U.S. Forest ... to a request from managers for a synthesis of ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Improved electricity access has little impact on climate change 2Sperm wars 2New report synthesizes best available science on management of moist mixed-conifer forests 2
(Date:10/19/2014)... OCTOBER 20-22, 2014: The 9th Annual ... take place at the Congress Center Basel, ... now available at http://www.abim.ch . ... from all over the globe will exchange ... products and developments on the world market. ...
(Date:10/19/2014)... October 19, 2014 The Asia-Pacific ... market in Asia-Pacific with analysis and forecast of ... Asia Pacific Bromine Market report, to get an ... provides a glimpse of the segmentation in the ... tables and figures. , http://www.micromarketmonitor.com/market/asia-pacific-bromine-6741503144.html ...
(Date:10/19/2014)... (PRWEB) October 19, 2014 The Asia-Pacific ... Analytics market in Asia-Pacific with analysis and forecast of ... million in 2014 to $208 million by 2019, at ... 2014 to 2019. , Browse through the TOC of ... idea of the in-depth analysis provided. It also provides ...
(Date:10/19/2014)... Asian Orthopedic braces and support systems report defines and segments ... revenue. The Orthopedic braces and support systems market in Asia ... at a developing CAGR of 4.4% from 2013 to 2018. ... and support systems market, to get an idea of the ... segmentation of orthopedic braces and support systems market in the ...
Breaking Biology Technology:The Asia-Pacific Bromine Market is estimated to grow to $4,080.1 million by 2018 - New Report by MicroMarket Monitor 2The Asia-Pacific Bromine Market is estimated to grow to $4,080.1 million by 2018 - New Report by MicroMarket Monitor 3The Asia-Pacific Speech Analytics market is estimated to reach $208 million by 2019 - New Report by MicroMarket Monitor 2The Asia-Pacific Speech Analytics market is estimated to reach $208 million by 2019 - New Report by MicroMarket Monitor 3The Asia-Pacific Speech Analytics market is estimated to reach $208 million by 2019 - New Report by MicroMarket Monitor 4The Asian Orthopedic braces and support systems market is estimated to grow to around $416.5 million by 2018 - New Report by MicroMarket Monitor 2The Asian Orthopedic braces and support systems market is estimated to grow to around $416.5 million by 2018 - New Report by MicroMarket Monitor 3The Asian Orthopedic braces and support systems market is estimated to grow to around $416.5 million by 2018 - New Report by MicroMarket Monitor 4
Cached News: