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Exisulind (Aptosyn™) and other SAANDs compounds halt prostate cancer cell growth by two mechanisms

HORSHAM, PA (April 3, 2000) -- Exisulind (Aptosyn™) and other selective apoptotic antineoplastic drugs (SAANDs) inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells in two ways, said researchers from Columbia University and their collaborators at Cell Pathways, Inc. (Nasdaq: CLPA). First, they directly kill cancerous prostate cells by inducing apoptosis. Secondly, they decrease expression of the androgen receptor in the cancerous prostate cells, making them less responsive to the growth-promoting effects of androgens in their environment. The Columbia University scientists and their Cell Pathways' collaborators presented their preclinical findings on Sunday April 2, 2000 at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) in San Francisco.

The researchers also demonstrated in a prostate cancer cell line that exisulind (Aptosyn™) and two other SAANDs, CP461 and CP248, inhibited the cellular expression and secretion of prostate specific antigen (PSA) at the same concentrations that induced apoptosis in the cells.

Dr. Bernard Weinstein, the senior investigator of these studies and director of the Columbia University Comprehensive Cancer Center, emphasized that "because of their dual mechanism of action, these agents are also effective in prostate cancer cells that have become independent of androgens."

"These findings also support the usefulness of PSA assays for measuring the efficacy of SAANDs in clinical trials for prostate cancer therapy or chemoprevention, as they demonstrate that a reduction in PSA levels accurately reflects cell death and not merely a reduction in PSA production when these drugs are used," added Rifat Pamukcu, M.D., chief scientific officer and senior vice president of research at Cell Pathways, Inc.

"This laboratory research complements the findings of our clinical trial of exisulind (Aptosyn™) as a treatment for post-prostatectomy men at risk of prostate cancer recurre
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Contact: Joan Kureczka
JKureczka@aol.com
415-821-2413
Kureczka/Martin Associates
2-Apr-2000


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