HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Fears over ICSI largely groundless say fertility experts

Most abnormalities in ICSI babies linked to multiple or premature births

Fears that the controversial fertility treatment known as ICSI could cause a high level of abnormalities among babies are largely unfounded, according to major new research by Swedish fertility experts, published today (Wednesday 29 March) in the journal Human Reproduction.*

A study of over a thousand babies born after ICSI did show that there was an increased risk of abnormalities compared with babies born without the use of any fertility treatments, but that this was mainly due to conditions generally associated with multiple or premature births rather than the ICSI technique itself. More than a third of the ICSI babies in the study were multiple births. However, the researchers did identify one condition that appeared to be directly associated with ICSI -- hypospadias -- a malformation of the penis.**

ICSI involves injecting a single sperm directly into a woman's egg and has been used since 1991 for men with severe fertility problems. There have been concerns that the technique could lead to abnormalities because of its nature and the quality of the sperm. Studies to date have shown conflicting results.

Using data from the Swedish Medical Birth Registry and the Registry of Congenital Malformations, the researchers compared the rate of abnormalities recorded among ICSI babies with the rate among all Swedish births and babies born by conventional IVF. Among the ICSI babies the risk of abnormalities was 75% higher than among the general population with 87 cases of some sort of malformation. Nearly half the cases involved only minor conditions.

Dr Ulla-Britt Wennerholm, senior registrar at Gteborg's Sahlgrenska University Hospital, said: "Although we found an excess risk among ICSI babies compared with babies born without fertility treatment, most of this was due to conditions associated with multiple and premature b
'"/>

Contact: Margaret Willson
m.willson@mwcommunications.org.uk
44-1536-772181
European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology
28-Mar-2000


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Fears of second-hand smoke confirmed
2. Fears grow over mad elk disease
3. Fears of gene-therapy DNA passed to next generation statistically unfounded: Penn geneticists estimates affect FDA gene-therapy policy
4. Age of menopause dictated largely by genes
5. Sugar-coated sea urchin eggs could have sweet implications for human fertility
6. Research reveals role of gene in infertility
7. Female infertility cAMP
8. UNC study finds protein in male reproductive tract kills bacteria, may improve fertility
9. NASA-inspired technology may help preserve womens future fertility after cancer treatment
10. Chlamydia in men now also linked to infertility new findings
11. Hormone linked to obesity plays positive role in fertility & possibly male arousal

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:1/4/2019)... ... January 03, 2019 , ... Stay on top of ... device and food industries. Access to all webinars is free, so be sure to ... your field! Visit http://www.xtalks.com to check out our upcoming webinars, or click ...
(Date:12/27/2018)... ... 27, 2018 , ... uBiome, the leader in microbial genomics, ... Morgan 37th Annual Healthcare Conference in San Francisco, which brings together industry leaders, ... , Since its origin in 1983, the JP Morgan Healthcare Conference has ...
(Date:12/22/2018)... ... December 21, 2018 , ... On ... the Boston Healthcare Drinks event featuring Helen Chen, Greater China Managing Partner of ... The discussion was moderated by patent attorney David J. Dykeman , co-chair ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/4/2019)... ... January 04, 2019 , ... ... Ted Hoffman to the firm. Ted will be joining the firm as a ... and providing consulting services to the pharmaceutical industry. At Triangle Insights, Ted will ...
(Date:1/4/2019)... Calif. (PRWEB) , ... January 02, 2019 , ... ... proprietary technology to detect precancer and cancer cells in blood, has been named ... Biotech , a global biotech company developing cell therapies for cancer treatment, will ...
(Date:12/20/2018)... Colo. (PRWEB) , ... December 20, 2018 , ... New ... 2019, with major changes in regulations in the European Union (EU) on the horizon, ... companies to consider. , “The transition to the EU Medical Device Regulation (MDR), digital ...
(Date:12/19/2018)... ... December 19, 2018 , ... RURO, Inc., a leading ... Limfinity® version 7.1. The new release enhances the latest version of Limfinity®, RURO’s ... to an end. , Validation protocols, and their execution, are critical for software ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: