HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Fighting diabetes: UD researchers move closer to chip-based control of 'smart,' implantable insulin pumps

d blood-sugar levels that can occur after a diabetic patient eats," he explains.

As a result, he says, patients may experience many hours of very high or low sugar levels before returning to a normal state.

The UD system more precisely controls blood sugar by constantly predicting the patient's need for insulin. Based on a mathematical model of the human glucose-insulin system, the algorithms analyze data from past events to forecast future insulin requirements.

And, because the algorithms are "linear," or simplified to approximate the function of the gut, the pancreas and other portions of body systems, they could be maintained on a tiny computer chip, Doyle says.

His approach, based on "model predictive control with state estimation" (MPCSE) algorithms, effectively reduced peak glucose levels by 44 percent, in computer simulations, compared to algorithms published in scholarly literature.

The system also reduced by 80 percent the "overshoot," or degree to which blood-sugar levels rose above a targeted range of 81 mg/dl, compared to patients with uncontrolled diabetes, Parker says. Small delays in receiving data from glucose sensors didn't seem to impair the performance of the UD system, which demonstrated a settling time of about 4.5 hours.

Doyle predicts that "smart" implantable insulin pumps won't become available to patients for another three to five years, even with FDA approval. But, he says, research presented at the AAMI meeting confirms the viability of this promising new technology.

Someday, he says: "Automatically controlled, implantable insulin delivery systems will no longer be science fiction."


'"/>

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gingpin@udel.edu
302-831-6408
University of Delaware
6-Jun-1999


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Fighting Mycobacterium tuberculosis with structural proteomics
2. Fighting fire with fire? Vaccine based on chimp virus shows promise against HIV
3. Fighting the spread of sudden oak death
4. Fighting the battle of the bulge in children
5. Fighting breast cancer at the molecular level
6. Fighting Fungi
7. Fighting skin cancers with computers and technology
8. Trash From Crop-Processing Plant Harvested For Disease-Fighting Agents
9. Studies At Cedars-Sinai Confirm Identity Of An Elusive Receptor In Human Cells -- A Breakthrough In Understanding, Fighting Septic Shock
10. Chemical Contaminants May Inhibit Cancer-Fighting White Blood Cells
11. Radioactive Beads Latest Weapon In Fighting Cancer In Dogs, Cats

Post Your Comments:
(Date:7/31/2014)... tuna movements in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean led by ... at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, found among other ... with pronounced north-south movements from Georges Bank to the ... Cape Hatteras southwest of Bermuda for foraging. , This ... one of the most important commercial tuna species in ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... by the National Science Foundation (NSF), counters a ... atmospheric warming, indicating instead that certain Arctic lakes ... the atmosphere. , The study, published this ... on thermokarst lakes, which occur as permafrost thaws ... fresh water, converting what was previously frozen land ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... By tracing nearly 3,000 genes to the earliest ... Florida scientists have created an extensive "Tree of ... next-generation DNA sequencing. , Among the study,s ... to small moths than to large ones, which ... The study also found that some insects once ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Study of bigeye tuna in Northwest Atlantic uses new tracking methods 2Study of bigeye tuna in Northwest Atlantic uses new tracking methods 3Certain Arctic lakes store more greenhouse gases than they release 2UF study advances 'DNA revolution,' tells butterflies' evolutionary history 2UF study advances 'DNA revolution,' tells butterflies' evolutionary history 3
(Date:7/31/2014)... July 31, 2014 Today BioSpace , the leading life ... map campaign spotlighting the life sciences community in Illinois ... Kansas , Michigan , Minnesota ... Ohio and Wisconsin . ... percent of all job postings on BioSpace originating in this region in ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... Nearly 20,000 medical professionals and healthcare leaders ... Clinical Lab Expo in Chicago ... diagnostic research and technology that will advance medicine and ... of Wednesday, July 30, more than 19,500 attendees had ... Lab Expo, with more than 10,000 of these attendees ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... reason people over 60 are not donor candidates for ... with time, making the elderly prone to life-threatening infection ... team now has discovered a reason why. , "We ... of blood-forming cells to maintain blood production over time ... that could be restored for rejuvenation therapies," said Emmanuelle ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... Alan Turing, the British mathematician (1912-1954), is famous for ... the 20th century. In 1936 he published a paper, ... first formal concept of a computer algorithm. He next ... designing the machines which cracked the German military codes, ... crucial battles. And in the late 1940,s he turned ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Midwest Biotech Leaders Featured On BioSpace Map 2Research on Digital Health, Alzheimer's, Ebola Draws Nearly 20,000 Attendees to 2014 AACC Annual Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo 2Research on Digital Health, Alzheimer's, Ebola Draws Nearly 20,000 Attendees to 2014 AACC Annual Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo 3Key to aging immune system is discovered 2A mathematical theory proposed by Alan Turing in 1952 can explain the formation of fingers 2A mathematical theory proposed by Alan Turing in 1952 can explain the formation of fingers 3
Cached News: