HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
First awards made in NIH effort to understand how genes affect people's responses to medicines

Diet, environment, and lifestyle can all influence how a person responds to medicines--but another key factor is genes. The National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) and other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) are sponsoring a nationwide research effort to understand how a person's genetic make-up determines the way a medicine works in his or her body, as well as what side effects the person might be prone to developing.

This so-called "pharmacogenetics" research focuses on linking the body's response to medicines with variations in particular genes. Many of these variations are expected to be "single-letter" differences, known as single-nucleotide polymorphisms or "SNPs." However, other genetic variations affecting how a person reacts to a specific medicine could be missing genes, or even extra genes. Through these types of studies, researchers ultimately hope to develop drug dosing into a much more predictive science.

"The outcome of pharmacogenetics research has the potential to improve the health of all Americans, by making the medicines of today and tomorrow safer and more effective for everyone," said Dr. Rochelle Long, a pharmacologist at NIGMS who spearheaded the pharmacogenetics initiative.

The trans-NIH effort is designed to forge an interactive research network of investigators who will store data in a shared information library freely accessible to the scientific community. To protect participants' privacy, names and other identifying information will not be stored in this library.

In addition to NIGMS, the other NIH components funding the pharmacogenetics research network awards are the National Cancer Institute (NCI); the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI); the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI); the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS); and the National Library of Medicine (NLM).

Nine awards, totaling $12.8 million for the first
'"/>

Contact: Alison Davis
davisa@nigms.nih.gov
301-496-7301
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences
3-Apr-2000


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. First glimpse of DNA binding to viral enzyme
2. First clinical study of new pediatric croup vaccine shows safety, tolerability in adults
3. 2nd media alert First Scientific Conference on Childhood Leukaemia
4. First International Scientific Conference on Childhood Leukaemia
5. First ever standards linking climate change, biodiversity and poverty seek global peer review
6. First genetic comparison of purebred domestic dogs produces surprises
7. First time in the U.S.: Saint Louis University tests third-generation vaccine against smallpox
8. First target for childhood malaria vaccine
9. First study of resveratrol dietary supplement finds effect on breast and prostate cancers unlikely
10. First flavors form a lasting impression
11. STN International launches Derwent World Patents Index First View

Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/18/2014)... referred for evaluation of suspected genetic conditions, whole-exome ... percent, including detection of a number of rare ... according to a study appearing in JAMA ... with the American Society of Human Genetics annual ... coding regions of thousands of genes simultaneously using ...
(Date:10/17/2014)... available in German . ... few drugs. When treating overdoses, doctors are often limited to ... if there is a combination of drugs involved. So what ... swallows his grandmother,s pills? ETH professor Jean-Christophe Leroux from the ... an answer to this question. "The task was to develop ...
(Date:10/16/2014)... they are anything but sustainable: environmental damage to ... becoming increasingly evident. Despite their disadvantages, however, monocultures ... as the sole possibility of achieving higher yields ... Schmid, an ecology professor at the University of ... and forestry. After all, a new study carried ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Whole-exome sequencing shows potential as diagnostic tool 2Emergency aid for overdoses 2Emergency aid for overdoses 3Plant communities produce greater yield than monocultures 2Plant communities produce greater yield than monocultures 3
(Date:10/25/2014)... (PRWEB) October 24, 2014 Today, Nerium ... announced the winners of its “Reflect Your Youth” contest, ... not only seen a difference in their skin since ... a new outlook on life as a result of ... originated as an effort by Nerium International to inspire ...
(Date:10/25/2014)... NEW YORK , Oct. 24, 2014 ... Access Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (ACCP), a biopharmaceutical company advancing ... implemented a 1-for-50 reverse split of its common ... Friday, October 24, 2014. PlasmaTech,s common stock will ... number 72754H109 and temporary ticker symbol "ACCPD". After ...
(Date:10/22/2014)... NEW YORK , Oct. 22, 2014 ... growth in the in vitro diagnostic (IVD) test industry, ... Kalorama Information. The healthcare market researcher listed more than 25 ... that could be the future of IVD products. Kalorama details ... industry, The Worldwide Market for In Vitro Diagnostic ...
(Date:10/22/2014)... Shimadzu Scientific Instruments introduces its Open ... the pain management and clinical markets. The software increases ... by allowing users to highlight and review results that ... allows analysts to filter results by group or based ... eliminating the need to sift through analytes of no ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Nerium International™ Inspires Conversation About the Journey of Aging with “Reflect Your Youth” Contest 2PlasmaTech Biopharmaceuticals, Inc. Announces Reverse Stock Split, Ticker Change and Launches New Corporate Website 2Report: Radical New IVD Test Approaches Key To Growth 2Report: Radical New IVD Test Approaches Key To Growth 3Shimadzu Releases QuantAnalytics Open Access LCMS Software Package for Clinical Applications 2
Cached News: