HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Gene defects tied to inability of cells to repair DNA damage

In new research carrying implications for human disease development, University of North Carolina scientists and others have linked gene defects to the inability of cells to repair damaged DNA.

The findings published April 13 in the journal Cell offer new insights into how cells repair the DNA damage that may occur during normal metabolism. Such naturally occurring oxidative damage promotes tissue changes thought to be associated with disease development, including cancer, heart disease and rheumatoid arthritis.

Study co-author Steven A. Leadon, Ph.D., head of molecular radiobiology at the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center said "oxidative damage is probably the most common type of damage humans are exposed to because we live and breath oxygen, and oxygen can be reactive and cause DNA damage." Within cells, oxidation leads to formation of free radicals, short-lived highly active particles that occur naturally during metabolism. These are also introduced into the body through smoking, inhaling environmental pollutants, or exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) radiation. From numerous studies, free radicals are known to interact readily with nearby molecules to cause cellular damage, including damage to genetic material.

Damage repair to an active gene, one that continually produces proteins crucial to cellular function, normally occurs through a process known as transcription coupled repair. "We were trying to understand how defects in one of the proteins required for this process works," Leadon said. "And what we were looking at was whether or not the defect has something to do with the inability to repair oxidative damage that occurs in a gene."

In 1998, Leadon and his UNC colleagues were the first to link the defective breast cancer gene BRCA1 to the inability of cells to correct DNA oxidative damage. His work directly demonstrated that BRCA1 was required for transcription-coupled repair. Those studies involved altered cells derived fro
'"/>

Contact: Leslie H. Lang
llang@med.unc.edu
919-843-9687
University of North Carolina School of Medicine
13-Apr-2000


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Cigarette smoke causes breaks in DNA and defects to a cells chromosomes, Pitt study finds
2. Gene defects found in age-related macular degeneration
3. Antioxidants during pregnancy may help prevent birth defects tied to alcohol
4. LARGE protein can overcome defects in some types of muscular dystrophy
5. Cardiofunk mutation: Probable source of congenital heart defects
6. Fat cells heal skull defects in mice, Stanford research shows
7. Missing gene a potential risk factor for birth defects
8. Cystic fibrosis gene linked to fatty acid defects
9. Researchers show absence of key oxygen-sensing molecule leads to developmental defects
10. Researchers identify second gene responsible for rare syndrome associated with skeletal defects
11. Stem cell defects are key to Hirschsprungs disease

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Gene defects tied inability cells repair DNA damage

(Date:10/29/2014)... and environmental, have been blamed for increasing the ... as a family history of schizophrenia, are widely ... gondii , a parasite transmitted by soil, undercooked ... skepticism. , A new study by Gary Smith, ... University of Pennsylvania,s School of Veterinary Medicine, used ...
(Date:10/29/2014)... all the rage. Thousands of scientists worldwide are conducting ... titanium dioxide nanoparticles from sun creams can get through ... from electronic products are as hazardous for the lungs ... food can get into the blood via the intestinal ... are flowing – and the number of scientific projects ...
(Date:10/29/2014)... news release is available in German . ... like another: Gabriela Cabral and Peter Schlögelhofer at the ... Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna dived into ... revealed that these plants display an inversion of the ... in the scientific journal Nature Communications . , ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Penn vet professor investigates parasite-schizophrenia connection 2Penn vet professor investigates parasite-schizophrenia connection 3Nanosafety research: The quest for the gold standard 2Nanosafety research: The quest for the gold standard 3Meiotic cell division 'the other way round' 2
(Date:10/30/2014)... 30, 2014 Spartan Bioscience announced today ... CYP2C19 System . It detects CYP2C19 genetic mutations in ... , The Spartan RX CYP2C19 System is the first ... approved in Canada. Due to the system’s ease of ... used by healthcare professionals such as doctors, nurses, pharmacists, ...
(Date:10/30/2014)... INDIANAPOLIS , Oct. 30, 2014 A ... Battelle Technology Partnership Practice, takes an in-depth look at ... innovation outputs that have resulted over two different time ... also provides a view of future opportunities for investment ... Indiana report shows gains in innovation ...
(Date:10/27/2014)... The new research report, “Gas ... Medium), Sub-type (Primary & Secondary), and End-User (Transmission ... & Power Generation) - Trends and Forecasts to ... analysis and forecasting of the market size. , ... 52 Figures spread through 146 Pages and in-depth ...
(Date:10/27/2014)... New Q4-2014 incentives help SoundConnect ... industry leading unified communication and collaboration provider, launches ... deliver cloud-based audio and web/video conferencing solutions to ... SoundConnect’s Q4 incentive partners will earn ... conferencing licenses sold, now through December 31st, 2014. ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Health Canada approves first near-patient DNA test for personalized medicine 2Health Canada approves first near-patient DNA test for personalized medicine 3New report shows Indiana's gains in life sciences innovation capital outpace the nation 2New report shows Indiana's gains in life sciences innovation capital outpace the nation 3New report shows Indiana's gains in life sciences innovation capital outpace the nation 4New report shows Indiana's gains in life sciences innovation capital outpace the nation 5Gas Insulated Switchgear Market worth $21,951.9 Million by 2019 - New Report by MarketsandMarkets 2Gas Insulated Switchgear Market worth $21,951.9 Million by 2019 - New Report by MarketsandMarkets 3Gas Insulated Switchgear Market worth $21,951.9 Million by 2019 - New Report by MarketsandMarkets 4SoundConnect Unveils Q4 Partner Incentives 2
Cached News: