HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Gene treatment can boost heart function in rabbits, Duke researchers say

DURHAM, N.C. -- Scientists at Duke University Medical Center have delivered therapeutic genes throughout a rabbit's heart and have shown that the genes can both boost heart function on their own and also increase sensitivity to heart-stimulating drugs.

According to the researchers, the experiments, reported in the July 1 Journal of Clinical Investigation, are a crucial step in developing a genetic treatment for congestive heart failure. This debilitating and deadly condition develops when heart muscle loses its ability to stretch and contract, usually due to clogged arteries caused by coronary artery disease. People with congestive heart failure often experience fatigue, weakness and an inability to carry out routine daily tasks. There is currently no effective means to reverse heart failure, only to treat symptoms.

The research is funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health and the American Heart Association (AHA).

According to the AHA, about 400,000 new cases of congestive heat failure are recorded every year in the United States. Death rates from congestive heart failure tripled between 1974 and 1994, making it the leading cause of hospitalization among people 65 and older and costing more than $10 billion a year.

Research team leader Walter J. Koch, an associate professor of experimental surgery, and his colleagues have been working for several years to find ways to efficiently deliver genes to the heart to boost heart function.

In their experiments, the scientists first incorporated the therapeutic genes into a live but disabled common cold virus. Then, in a surgical technique that was a key to their success, the scientists injected the virus into the left ventricle of live rabbits while the aorta was clamped for a few seconds. This technique allowed the virus enough time to spread through all the coronary vessels to reach a majority of the heart muscle. Clamping the aorta is som
'"/>

Contact: Karyn Hede
Hede0001@mc.duke.edu
919-684-4148
Duke University Medical Center
30-Jun-1999


Page: 1 2 3 4

Related biology news :

1. Leader in cancer treatment and prevention research honored
2. International study findings link acne-like rash to effectiveness of new targeted cancer treatment
3. New study indicates arsenic could be suitable as first-line treatment in type of leukaemia
4. New treatment for fibromyalgia
5. The impact of genetic variations on the treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis
6. OneWorld Health compiles comprehensive state of infectious diarrhea treatments, potential solutions
7. Early clinical treatment can halt progression of Alzheimers disease, UCI researchers find
8. Colleagues to recognize research leadership in cancer detection, prevention and treatment
9. New view of leukemia cells identifies best treatment options, Stanford researchers say
10. Genetic model for devastating form of paraplegia suggests new treatments
11. Protective mechanism exploited by tumors may provide new cancer treatment

Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/15/2014)... Alt will be awarded the 44th Rosenstiel Award for ... his pioneering research exploring the mechanisms of genomic instability ... cells. Alt is the second alumnus to win the ... Prize in 2003. , Alt is the Charles A. ... Harvard Medical School and an investigator at the Howard ...
(Date:10/14/2014)... 2014)—It,s been millions of years since T. rex ... by Ohio University scientists is breathing life back into ... dinosaur snouts. The research has important implications for how ... to enhance the sense of smell and cool their ... Ohio University doctoral student Jason Bourke, lead author of ...
(Date:10/14/2014)... 2014 – High doses of fish oil supplements, rich in ... type of irregular heartbeat in which the heart can beat ... the AFFORD trial led by the Montreal Heart Institute were ... Cardiology on October 7th. , For the trial, 337 ... randomly assigned to 4 grams of fish oil a day ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Brandeis awards 44th Rosenstiel Award to pioneering geneticist Fred Alt 2Dinosaur breathing study shows that noses enhanced smelling and cooled brain 2Dinosaur breathing study shows that noses enhanced smelling and cooled brain 3
(Date:10/20/2014)... 2014 /PRNewswire/ - BIOREM Inc. (TSXV: BRM) ("Biorem" or "the Company") ... orders to $5.8 million and provides a good start to Q4.  ... North America and one in the Middle ... at record levels," said Peter Bruijns , President & CEO. ... of Q3 than they have been for any complete year since ...
(Date:10/20/2014)... OncLive® is pleased ... at Thomas Jefferson University has joined its Strategic ... Alliance Partnership program, the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center ... awareness of the Center’s cutting-edge research programs, comprehensive ... and other health care professionals from the Sidney ...
(Date:10/19/2014)... OCTOBER 20-22, 2014: The 9th Annual ... take place at the Congress Center Basel, ... now available at http://www.abim.ch . ... from all over the globe will exchange ... products and developments on the world market. ...
(Date:10/19/2014)... 19, 2014 The Asia-Pacific Speech Analytics ... in Asia-Pacific with analysis and forecast of revenue. This ... 2014 to $208 million by 2019, at a Compound ... 2019. , Browse through the TOC of the Asia-Pacific ... the in-depth analysis provided. It also provides a glimpse ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Thomas Jefferson University Partners With OncLive 2Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Thomas Jefferson University Partners With OncLive 3The Asia-Pacific Speech Analytics market is estimated to reach $208 million by 2019 - New Report by MicroMarket Monitor 2The Asia-Pacific Speech Analytics market is estimated to reach $208 million by 2019 - New Report by MicroMarket Monitor 3The Asia-Pacific Speech Analytics market is estimated to reach $208 million by 2019 - New Report by MicroMarket Monitor 4
Cached News: