HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Geologists find spines make comfy home for some marine organisms

A University of Cincinnati geologist will explain how marine organisms use spines for more than self-defense during a presentation Wednesday, Nov. 7 during the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America in Boston.

Donna Carlson Jones, a doctoral candidate in the UC geology department, conducted a yearlong study in the Florida Keys looking at how spines and other shell decorations affected the number of epibionts present. Epibionts are organisms that grow on top of other organisms without seriously harming them.

Her primary focus was the bivalve Spondylus regis which has a spiny surface, but the spines are so delicate and widespread, they don't appear capable of protecting the organism directly. Jones compared Spondylus with three other bivalves: the mussel Mytilus edulis which has a smooth surface, an oyster Crassostrea sp. which has a rough surface, and the scallop Pectin sp. which has ribs. She also included an experimental group of Spondylus which had its spines removed.

"Spondylus has beautiful spines, but they're widely spaced and fragile compared with the overall shell strength," noted Jones, who added that the spines clearly don't deter some crabs which prey on the bivalve and predatory starfish can actually use spines on other types of bivalves as leverage to pry open the shells.

Jones hypothesized that the spines increase the bivalve's surface area which provide more room and a more hospitable environment for epibionts. Additionally, spines may trap material such as algae out of the water currents. Her research demonstrated a clear difference in the number of epiobionts growing on Spondylus with spines and the other four groups.

So, instead of directly warding off predators, the spines could protect Spondylus in an indirect way. The epibionts might provide a camouflage cover that could reduce overall predation on the bivalves.

Jones is continuing her work by examining the wi
'"/>

Contact: Chris Curran
chris.curran@uc.edu
513-556-1806
University of Cincinnati
7-Nov-2001


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Geologists discover water cuts through rock at surprising speed
2. Geologists show how wetlands can clean up acid mine drainage
3. Geologists develop new database using GIS for study of evolution of continents
4. Geologists explore beach nourishment controversies, groundwater quality, and Blue Ridge mountain issues
5. Geologists at UNC-CH discover states most spectacular fossils
6. From Germany To The Wild West: Geologists Hunt For Evidence Of Ancient Crinoid
7. University Of Cincinnati Geologists Analyzes Evolutionary Impact Of Mass Extinctions
8. An Equal Opportunity Extinction? Cincinnati Geologists Find Global Impact from Permian Die
9. Duke Geologists Explore Alternative Way To Measure Ice Age Sea Bottom Temperatures
10. Evolutions mirror in a fishs spines
11. Embryonic hope for damaged spines

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Geologists find spines make comfy home for some marine organisms

(Date:7/2/2015)... Fingerprint Cards has received an order for its ... distributor World Peace Industrial Group (WPI), part of WPG Holdings. ... . Deliveries are planned to take place during Q3 ... manufacturers in Asia . The order value ... of approximately 2,200 MSEK for 2015. Jörgen Lantto, ...
(Date:6/25/2015)... 2015 According to a ... & Area), Technology, Material (Optical Prism, Piezoelectric, Capacitive ... & Others) & Geography - Global Forecast to ... market is expected to reach $14,500.07 Million by ... Browse 76 market Tables and 109 Figures ...
(Date:6/24/2015)... June 24, 2015  Synaptics Inc. (NASDAQ: ... solutions, today announced that Sharp has selected its ... authentication for its latest flagship smartphone device, the ... 200 million shipments of its fingerprint ID sensor ... strength, scalability and leadership in the biometrics market ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):FPC Receives Order for Touch Fingerprint Sensors of 268 MSEK 2Fingerprint Sensors Market Worth $14,500.07 Million by 2020 2Fingerprint Sensors Market Worth $14,500.07 Million by 2020 3Fingerprint Sensors Market Worth $14,500.07 Million by 2020 4Synaptics Brings Natural ID Technology to Sharp's Newest Flagship Smartphone 2
(Date:7/29/2015)... ... July 29, 2015 , ... ... Clinical, a Silicon Valley-based CRO specializing in Clinical Trial Management. CSSi LifeSciences ... recruitment services. The core expertise of PRC Clinical is focused on Clinical Trial ...
(Date:7/29/2015)... MA (PRWEB) , ... July 29, 2015 , ... Nearly ... of serious diseases. Yet few people realize that a rich source of these cells ... young adults, and teeth that need to be pulled to make room for braces. ...
(Date:7/28/2015)... -- People with a common form of hearing loss ... profound improvements in their hearing and understanding of speech ... multicenter study led by specialists at NYU Langone Medical ... of print in the journal The Laryngoscope July 7, researchers ... the United States implanted hybrid cochlear ...
(Date:7/28/2015)... ... July 28, 2015 , ... VetStem Biopharma will be offering weekly private guided ... local area veterinarians. , The tour and course will be given every Wednesday at ... VetStem’s Poway facility. Staff members are welcome to attend with their veterinarian as well. ...
Breaking Biology Technology:CSSi LifeSciences And PRC Clinical Join Forces To Offer Extended Clinical Trial Services 2CSSi LifeSciences And PRC Clinical Join Forces To Offer Extended Clinical Trial Services 3Advanced Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (AOMS) in Elmhurst, IL Partners with Provia Labs to make Store-A-Tooth™ Dental Stem Cell Banking Available to their Patients 2Hybrid Cochlear Implants For Common Form Of Hearing Loss May Benefit Millions 2Hybrid Cochlear Implants For Common Form Of Hearing Loss May Benefit Millions 3VetStem Biopharma weekly veterinary continuing education classes and GMP manufacturing facility tour 2
Cached News: