HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Gladstone study reveals how genetic factor may increase risk for Alzheimer's disease

Researchers at the Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease have identified processes that may explain how a key protein, apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4), contributes to the development of Alzheimer's disease. Their findings, described in the Journal of Neuroscience (March 10, 2004), include identifying where in the brain apoE4 is broken down into toxic fragments that can impair the function and survival of nerve cells. Results of their study may point the way to a new therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

ApoE4 is the best known genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, but, until now, the mechanism by which it increases that risk has remained a mystery. The key finding of the current study relates to apoE4's tendency to be broken down into toxic fragments when it is produced in neurons, the brain cells responsible for cognitive functions.

Proteins can be broken into small pieces by enzymes known as proteases in a process termed proteolysis. While the degradation of proteins is important for many cell processes, it can be harmful when it occurs inappropriately, not only because it destroys the protein, but also because abnormally high levels of fragments can damage cells.

In the new study, involving the examination of genetically engineered mice, Gladstone researchers have established that:

  • only apoE4 produced by neurons is susceptible to fragmentation, unlike apoE4 produced by other brain cells;
  • fragmentation is correlated with age, occurring more frequently the older the animal, similar to the effect of age on Alzheimer disease risk in humans;
  • fragmentation of apoE4 occurs predominantly in the very parts of the brain that are most vulnerable to Alzheimer's disease, the neocortex and hippocampus. In contrast, fragmentation does not occur in the cerebellum, which is much less vulnerable to Alzheimer's disease;
  • the apoE4 fragments cause
    '"/>


Contact: John Watson
jwatson@gladstone.ucsf.edu
415-695-3833
University of California - San Francisco
23-Mar-2004


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Gladstone investigator Mike McCune wins prestigious NIH Directors Pioneer Award
2. The future of HIV therapeutics is brightening, according to Gladstone Institutes Director
3. Gladstone researchers find method to study hidden HIV reservoirs
4. New Gladstone/UCSF study finds inhibiting fat synthesis results in obesity resistance in mice
5. Gladstone/UCSF team discovers interaction of two brain proteins may be key factor in development of Alzheimers disease
6. AIDS Virus May Evolve Differently In Cerebrospinal Fluid Compared With Blood In Some Patients, UCSF/Gladstone Research Finds
7. UCSF/Gladstone Finding May Explain HIVS Ability To Infect Cells Lacking The Key Target Of HIV: The CD4 Receptor
8. Breakthrough In Understanding The Biology Of Fat-- UCSF/Gladstone Scientists Discover Gene For Key Enzyme
9. Student science contest participation influences study, career choices, alumni say
10. New study shows hope for treating inhalant abuse
11. International study findings link acne-like rash to effectiveness of new targeted cancer treatment

Post Your Comments:
(Date:4/17/2014)... CHAMPAIGN, Ill. A drug under clinical trials to ... of broad-spectrum drugs that act against various bacteria, fungal ... study by University of Illinois chemists and collaborators. , ... the team determined the different ways the drug SQ109 ... tweaked to target other pathogens from yeast to malaria ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... NY, April 17, 2014The development of stem cell therapies ... ability to characterize stem cell populations based on cell ... discovered a new marker that is highly expressed in ... cord blood, which they describe in an article in ... Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... Gauthier and Professor Luca Razzari of the nergie ... large grants from the John R. Evans Leaders ... for the acquisition of state-of-the-art biotech and nanophotonics ... grants from the Ministre de l,Enseignement suprieur, de ... Technologie (MESRST). These new laboratories will help us ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Multitarget TB drug could treat other diseases, evade resistance 2New state-of-the-art biotech and nanotech equipment for INRS 2
(Date:1/15/2014)... Arizona (PRWEB) January 15, 2014 2013 ... for Scottsdale’s Brain State Technologies®. They saw continued independent ... Medical Center who were awarded a $1 million grant ... published in “Brain and Behavior” a peer reviewed journal, ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... January 15, 2014 AudioNotch is the ... therapy for the treatment of tinnitus. Patients listen to ... and over a period of weeks to months, their tinnitus ... in two forms: Notched Music and Notched White Noise. Now, ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... PA (PRWEB) January 14, 2014 Date: Friday, ... , Location: Warrington Country Club, 1360 Almshouse Road, Warrington, Pa. ... national nonprofit organization solely dedicated to finding a cure for ... affected worldwide, will host its annual Crystal Ball on Friday, ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... 2014 Histogen, Inc., a regenerative medicine ... grown under simulated embryonic conditions, today announced that they ... Medical, Inc. for physician-dispensed aesthetic products containing Histogen’s proprietary ... agreement is an amendment to the existing license between ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Dynamic Innovative Technology Showcased at Scottsdale Company’s Open House 2Dynamic Innovative Technology Showcased at Scottsdale Company’s Open House 3Hepatitis B Foundation to Host Annual Crystal Ball Gala 2Histogen and Suneva Medical Expand License for Cell Conditioned Media-based Aesthetic Products Internationally 2Histogen and Suneva Medical Expand License for Cell Conditioned Media-based Aesthetic Products Internationally 3
Cached News: