HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Global warming may cause songbirds to avoid certain foods

KINGSTON, R.I. -- January 26, 2004 -- In yet another example of the far-reaching impact of global warming, a University of Rhode Island student found evidence that suggests some songbirds may avoid eating insects that consume leaves exposed to high levels of carbon dioxide.

URI senior Martina Mller of Kingston, working in cooperation with Associate Professor Scott McWilliams, Ph.D. candidate David Podlesak and colleagues at the University of Wisconsin, studied the food preferences exhibited by black-capped chickadees.

"When plants are grown in conditions of higher carbon dioxide, they produce increased levels of several secondary compounds -- tannins and phenolics -- that they use to defend against herbivory," said the 23-year-old wildlife conservation and biology major. "Those secondary compounds are absorbed by gypsy moth caterpillars that feed on the plant's leaves, which other researchers have found reduces the caterpillar's growth rates. We wanted to see if the chickadees can detect the secondary compounds in the caterpillars and if they have preferences for caterpillars that fed on different types of leaves."

Using chickadees captured in Kingston and acclimated for three days, Mller and McWilliams fed the birds a choice of caterpillars that were high in tannins or phenolics and other caterpillars low in those compounds.

"It was clear that the birds could tell the difference between the different caterpillars and they had strong preferences," Mller said. "They're intelligent birds with a keen capacity to learn."

While the birds showed a distinct preference for caterpillars low in tannins and phenolics, they also showed a preference for foods they had eaten previously. "Previous experience does affect their preferences," Mller said.

So what does all this mean? According to McWilliams, it could mean a great deal in a world that is growing warmer due to increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere
'"/>

Contact: Todd McLeish
tmcleish@uri.edu
401-874-7892
University of Rhode Island
26-Jan-2004


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Global competition closes Texas sawmills/paper mills
2. Global warming and the onward march of the pine
3. Global warming to squeeze western mountains dry by 2050
4. Global wetlands surveyed from space
5. Fourteen Grand Challenges in Global Health announced
6. Global analysis finds a large portion of the earth is still wilderness
7. Global garden grows greener
8. Jane Goodall to receive 2003 Global Environmental Citizen Award
9. Global analysis finds nearly half the Earth is still wilderness
10. Global warming has uneven effect on coastal animals
11. Global aluminium waste headache solved

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/11/2017)... , Apr. 11, 2017 Research and Markets ... 2017-2021" report to their offering. ... The global eye tracking market to grow at a CAGR ... Global Eye Tracking Market 2017-2021, has been prepared based on an ... the market landscape and its growth prospects over the coming years. ...
(Date:4/5/2017)... -- Today HYPR Corp. , leading innovator in ... the HYPR platform is officially FIDO® Certified . ... that empowers biometric authentication across Fortune 500 enterprises and ... 15 million users across the financial services industry, however ... suites and physical access represent a growing portion of ...
(Date:3/30/2017)... The research team of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University ... adopting ground breaking 3D fingerprint minutiae recovery and matching technology, pushing ... for use in identification, crime investigation, immigration control, security of access ... ... A research team led by Dr Ajay ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/28/2017)... 28, 2017  Scientific Analytics, Inc.,s DARI Motion Health is ... of thousands of healthcare providers at Premier Inc.,s 2017 ... Scientific Analytics, DARI Motion Health was debuted during the conference,s ... healthcare while highlighting industry suppliers committed to innovation and improving ... ...
(Date:6/28/2017)... ... June 28, 2017 , ... Ovation Fertility ... projects accepted for presentation at the 33rd Annual Meeting of the European ... some of the world’s top thought leaders in reproductive medicine – are expected ...
(Date:6/28/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... June 28, 2017 , ... Studies indicate ... lead to an effective treatment for Parkinson’s disease. But what has not been determined ... take place to gain the best results. , A new study coming out of ...
(Date:6/27/2017)... ... June 27, 2017 , ... ... powder activated carbon (PAC)-based materials do not have negative short- or long-term effects ... site contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) located at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: