HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Handling stress: life and death decisions at the cellular level

The daily life of a cell can be inordinately stressful. Two papers in the September 15th issue of Genes & Development highlight recent discoveries that have been made regarding how cells handle environmental stress, and decide whether or not their life is worth living. Both papers lend valuable insight into the ways that different cells respond to oxygen deprivation, or hypoxia.

Teetering on the Edge

A team of scientists led by Dr. Bohdan Wasylyk at the INSERM research center in France has discovered that the steroid receptor, GR, and the tumor suppressor, p53, interact during periods of oxygen deprivation to help balance the decision between cell survival and cell death.

p53 is commonly referred to as "the guardian of the genome" for its integral role in mediating either cell cycle arrest or cell death in response to various types of cell stress. Loss of p53 function can lead to unregulated cell proliferation, an event that is associated with the development of most tumors. The glucocorticoid receptor, GR, binds steroid hormones and helps to mediate the normal response to stress.

Dr. Wasylyk and colleagues determined that under hypoxic conditions p53 and ligand-bound GR directly associate with one another in the cytoplasm of the cell. This p53/GR complex is then bound by another protein, Hdm2, which facilitates the degredation of both p53 and GR. In this manner, the p53-mediated death response is held in check by GR, and the GR-mediated survival response is held in check by p53. This antagonistic interaction between p53 and GR represents a novel mechanism to balance cell survival and cell death in response to environmental stress.

Nervous Stress

Scientists from UMASS Medical School and Yale University School of Medicine report on the involvement of a key player in the stress response pathway in neurons. The JIP1 protein is a component of a pathway that is activated in response to ce
'"/>

Contact: Nora Poppito
poppito@cshl.org
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
14-Sep-2001


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Key cell-death step found
2. Optimizing proteins death domain halts leukemia in laboratory study
3. Small, Smac-like molecule encourages death of cancer cells
4. Heartless worms hold clues to cardiac arrhythmias, sudden death
5. Ecologists help keep death off the roads
6. Researchers identify gene for a primary form of sudden infant death sydrome (SIDS)
7. Cell death protein has surprising role in cell migration
8. Improved nutrition could prevent more than half of the worlds child deaths annually
9. JGI, VBI help unravel sudden oak death & soybean disease
10. Virginia Bioinformatics Institute researcher advances fight against sudden oak death disease
11. Cell growth and death controlled by single pathway in lymphoma cancer model

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:12/15/2016)... , December 15, 2016 Arvato ... an agreement with NuData Security, an award-winning international ... will enable clients to focus on good customer experience, balancing ... regulation. ... In order to provide a one-stop fraud prevention suite, Arvato ...
(Date:12/15/2016)... Dec. 15, 2016 Advancements in ... health wellness and wellbeing (HWW), and security ... three new passenger vehicles begin to feature ... recognition, heart beat monitoring, brain wave monitoring, ... monitoring, and pulse detection. These will be ...
(Date:12/12/2016)... Dec. 12, 2016  Researchers at Trinity College, ... graphene by combining the material with Silly Putty. The ... pressure detector able to sense pulse, blood pressure, ... spider.  The research team,s findings ... read here:  http://science.sciencemag.org/content/354/6317/1257 ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/12/2017)... ... January 12, 2017 , ... MEXICO’S FIRST ... Inc., announces the successful outcome of the first lumbar fusion procedure in ... Technologies, Inc.) has partnered with Mexico-based medical product company BioMedical Technologies to ...
(Date:1/12/2017)... -- The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI) ... mycorrhizae. The Centre for Mycorrhizal Research at TERI has ... developed a technology that eventually produces mycorrhizae based biofertilizer. ... ... TERI facility has a production capacity of over 600 ...
(Date:1/11/2017)... ... January 11, 2017 , ... Phase 1 clinical ... promise of the investigational anti-cancer agent tucatinib (formerly ONT-380) against HER2+ breast cancer. ... Twenty-seven percent of these heavily pretreated patients saw clinical benefit from the drug, ...
(Date:1/11/2017)... Ca (PRWEB) , ... January 11, 2017 , ... ... U.S. each year and costing healthcare systems more than $23.7 billion, healthcare ... controlling costs. , Among the most common sepsis-causing pathogens are bacteria and ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: