HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Heart Disease Symptoms Worsen When Body Tries To Adapt

Mouse Model Provides Window into How the Disease Progresses

For years doctors have debated whether the progressively destructive course of genetic heart disease is due principally to the altered genes that set it in motion, or to the body's ceaseless efforts to compensate for and cope with the initial damage. Now results of a Johns Hopkins-led study in mice, published in the March issue of Nature Medicine, show that many of the disease's common features are better explained by the latter theory.

Using a miniaturized catheter developed at Hopkins, researchers compared the heart pumping action of healthy young and old mice to those of same-age mice harboring a defective gene that causes familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) -- a potentially fatal form of inherited heart disease in which the heart wall thickens and obstructs blood flow.

Hypertropic cardiomyopathy is associated with changes in the proteins principally responsible for the capacity of heart muscle to contract and relax as it pumps blood throughout the body. As a result, the wall of the left ventricle -- the heart's main pumping chamber -- thickens, leaving little room inside the chamber for blood to fill. The wall also can stiffen, further impairing the heart's ability to contract.

While the hearts of both younger and older mice with FHC had the identical gene defect, they performed differently. Both contracted faster but relaxed abnormally slowly. However, the hearts of the older FHC mice squeezed much harder only to pump less blood. The higher pressure, reduced volume, and accompanying stiffness were seen only in the older, FHC mice, indicating evolving responses do the damage over time. The same traits are hallmarks of the disease in humans.

"This study provides a major new window to the development of this disease," says David A. Kass, M.D., senior author of the study and professor of medicine and biomedical enginee
'"/>

Contact: Karen Infeld
kinfeld@jhmi.edu
410-955-1534
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
4-Mar-1999


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Heart gene yields insights into evolution, disease risk
2. Heartless worms hold clues to cardiac arrhythmias, sudden death
3. Media invited to attend International Society For Heart & Lung Transplantation meeting April 21-24
4. Heart and lung transplantation clinical trial results to be announced at ISHLT meeting
5. Heart may heal with help from oxygen-sensitive genes, new study suggests
6. Heart drug might help fight chronic fungal infections
7. Heart disease among some Japanese may be due to sequencing variation inside a gene
8. Heart size and function uncoupled by researchers
9. Heart disease gene linked to prostate cancer
10. Heart-felt stress can be more dangerous to immune system
11. Society for Womens Health Research will be releasing reports related to Heart Month

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:3/11/2020)... FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (PRWEB) , ... March 11, ... ... Commission Accredited teleradiology and telemedicine company backed by Siemens Healthineers and several healthcare ... has already infected over 100,000 people in over 100 countries and has caused ...
(Date:3/5/2020)... ... March 05, 2020 , ... ... Board (SAB) comprised of the industry’s key opinion leaders and distinguished research ... private industry. Cytonus is a leading cell-based platform technology company focused on ...
(Date:3/4/2020)... , ... March 04, 2020 , ... ... and CEOs to apply to the MedTech IGNITE program’s 2020 IGNITE Cohort. The ... networking curriculum to attract and nurture the next generation of medtech founders and ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:3/10/2020)... ... , ... Lifecycle Biotechnologies announced today that is has acquired a ... as a biopharmaceutical and biotechnology production and development campus. Lifecycle is currently updating the ... production and development hub. The company expects to relocate from Fort Worth, Texas by ...
(Date:3/3/2020)... ... , ... Ideal Implant Incorporated Founder and CEO, Robert S ... IMCAS Innovation Shark Tank 2020 in Paris, France in January. The international conference ... industries that promise to revolutionize medical practices in their fields. , “After ...
(Date:2/21/2020)... ... 2020 , ... In a free session on Tuesday, March 10, ... Lisa Dilworth, BS, MS, Vice President Rare, Orphan and Pediatric Diseases, and Rachael Young, ... to support patients, sites and sponsors. , When planning a rare disease clinical trial, ...
(Date:2/21/2020)... , ... February 21, 2020 , ... ... improve their manufacturing operations in order to adapt to new approaches like ‘Industry ... with the increasing demand for personalized medicine and therapies. But with an industry ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: