HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
High-Pressure Chambers Could Prevent Paralysis After Spinal Cord Injury

WASHINGTON D.C. -- High-pressure chambers used to treat deep sea divers for decompression sickness could play a key role in preventing permanent spinal cord damage and paralysis to many of the thousands of Americans who suffer spinal cord injuries every year, a doctor from Scotland reported today.

Dr. Philip James of the University of Dundee reported at a conference here that putting patients under high pressure forces more cell-resuscitating oxygen into damaged spinal nerves than is possible at normal atmospheric pressure.

"It may mean the difference between significant disability and no disability," James said.

James made his remarks at a meeting of the Space and Underwater Research Group of the World Federation of Neurology. The meeting is being coordinated by the Stroke Research Center of the Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center.

James has been a consulting physician to North Sea diving operations for 25 years. Divers sometimes suffer from bubbles in their spinal cord, resulting in tissue damage that is similar to the bruising that spinal cords suffer from traumatic injury.

Typically, nerve tissue in the spinal cord is starved of oxygen because the small capillaries that carry blood to the tissue are damaged. If adequate blood flow is not restored within hours, the nerve cells in the spinal cord die from lack of oxygen. This can result in complete or partial paralysis.

Placing these divers in hyperbaric chambers and raising the pressure to 2.8 times the normal atmospheric pressure hastens their recovery, James said, because under high pressure the blood carries proportionally more oxygen. This raises the oxygen levels in the damaged nerve tissue toward normal levels to assist recovery. For spinal cord injury patients, raising the pressure to two times atmospheric pressure would be adequate, James said.

An es
'"/>

Contact: Robert Conn
rconn@wfubmc.edu
336-716-4977
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center
10-May-1998


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Endometriosis: Could angiostatic therapy be the new treatment of the future?
2. Could mice hold the secret to longer life?
3. Could vitamins raise levels of bad cholesterol? Animal study suggests they might
4. Could memory performance and spatial learning be genetically based?
5. Could a specific protein contribute to erectile dysfunction for the diabetic and obese?
6. Could diabetes treatments fight cancer?
7. Could rice be the source for a natural herbicide?
8. Could hibernators hold the key to improving organ preservation?
9. Could Bt transgenic crops have nutritionally favourable effects on insects?
10. Could one less cookie a day help the fight against fat?
11. Could an anti-marijuana compound hold the key to body weight and appetite control?

Post Your Comments:
(Date:4/17/2014)... and pathogens that devastate honeybees in Europe, Asia and ... do not appear to be impacting native honeybee populations ... researchers., The invasive pests include including Nosema microsporidia ... honeybees appear to be resilient to these invasive pests, ... control pests in Europe, Asia and the United States ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... Current Biology on April 17 have discovered ... Brazilian insects, which represent four distinct but related species ... example of an animal with sex-reversed genitalia. , ... animals, Neotrogla is the only example in ... Yoshizawa from Hokkaido University in Japan. , During copulation, ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... Scientists have uncovered a new way the immune system ... aid efforts to use immune cells to treat illness. ... have the immunological equivalent of "neighborhood police" specialized ... single organ, instead of an entire city, the body. ... St. Louis have shown that the liver, skin and ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):East African honeybees are safe from invasive pests… for now 2East African honeybees are safe from invasive pests… for now 3In sex-reversed cave insects, females have the penises 2Some immune cells defend only 1 organ 2
(Date:1/15/2014)... SAN JOSE, California , January 15, 2014 ... antibody-drug conjugates for cancer, today announced the appointment of Thomas ... Reynolds has over 20 years, development experience gained in the ... Genetics. "I am delighted to welcome Tom at ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... (PRWEB) January 15, 2014 This webinar ... nonclinical and clinical safety assessment in biosimilars. , Regulatory ... for biosimilar drug development, however the complex nature of ... quality, safety and efficacy extremely challenging. Based on the ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... January 15, 2014 More than 5 ... about 1 in 3 seniors will die with Alzheimer’s ... These jaw-dropping figures have shocked many Americans into looking ... help prevent these tragic age-related cognitive disorders. Jonathan Weisman, ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... The Microcompetition with Foreign DNA theory explains ... these latent viruses is the Epstein Barr Virus (EBV), and ... (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease that destroys the body’s ... RA patients have high concentrations of EBV DNA in their ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Oxford BioTherapeutics Appoints Thomas C Reynolds MD, PhD to its Board of Directors 2Oxford BioTherapeutics Appoints Thomas C Reynolds MD, PhD to its Board of Directors 3Xtalks Life Sciences Webinar Examines Safety Assessment of Biosimilars 2Biohack Pure Offers 5 Tips for Increasing Memory in 2014 2Study: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Patients Have EBV; The CBCD Says this is Consistent with Microcompetition 2Study: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Patients Have EBV; The CBCD Says this is Consistent with Microcompetition 3
Cached News: