HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
High-Pressure Chambers Could Prevent Paralysis After Spinal Cord Injury

WASHINGTON D.C. -- High-pressure chambers used to treat deep sea divers for decompression sickness could play a key role in preventing permanent spinal cord damage and paralysis to many of the thousands of Americans who suffer spinal cord injuries every year, a doctor from Scotland reported today.

Dr. Philip James of the University of Dundee reported at a conference here that putting patients under high pressure forces more cell-resuscitating oxygen into damaged spinal nerves than is possible at normal atmospheric pressure.

"It may mean the difference between significant disability and no disability," James said.

James made his remarks at a meeting of the Space and Underwater Research Group of the World Federation of Neurology. The meeting is being coordinated by the Stroke Research Center of the Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center.

James has been a consulting physician to North Sea diving operations for 25 years. Divers sometimes suffer from bubbles in their spinal cord, resulting in tissue damage that is similar to the bruising that spinal cords suffer from traumatic injury.

Typically, nerve tissue in the spinal cord is starved of oxygen because the small capillaries that carry blood to the tissue are damaged. If adequate blood flow is not restored within hours, the nerve cells in the spinal cord die from lack of oxygen. This can result in complete or partial paralysis.

Placing these divers in hyperbaric chambers and raising the pressure to 2.8 times the normal atmospheric pressure hastens their recovery, James said, because under high pressure the blood carries proportionally more oxygen. This raises the oxygen levels in the damaged nerve tissue toward normal levels to assist recovery. For spinal cord injury patients, raising the pressure to two times atmospheric pressure would be adequate, James said.

An es
'"/>

Contact: Robert Conn
rconn@wfubmc.edu
336-716-4977
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center
10-May-1998


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Endometriosis: Could angiostatic therapy be the new treatment of the future?
2. Could mice hold the secret to longer life?
3. Could vitamins raise levels of bad cholesterol? Animal study suggests they might
4. Could memory performance and spatial learning be genetically based?
5. Could a specific protein contribute to erectile dysfunction for the diabetic and obese?
6. Could diabetes treatments fight cancer?
7. Could rice be the source for a natural herbicide?
8. Could hibernators hold the key to improving organ preservation?
9. Could Bt transgenic crops have nutritionally favourable effects on insects?
10. Could one less cookie a day help the fight against fat?
11. Could an anti-marijuana compound hold the key to body weight and appetite control?

Post Your Comments:
(Date:4/22/2014)... Inspired by the fist-like club of a mantis ... California, Riverside, in collaboration with University of Southern California ... composite materials that is more impact resistant and tougher ... we study the club of this tiny crustacean, the ... things we use every day," said David Kisailus, a ...
(Date:4/22/2014)... University of Massachusetts Amherst and the Instituto Nacional de ... they have discovered a new genus and species of ... in the Amazonia State of Brazil. , Professor Cristina ... Jos Antnio Alves-Gomes of INPA, describe the new bluntnose ... Proceedings of the Natural Sciences of Philadelphia . ...
(Date:4/22/2014)... American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) has released ... how funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) ... Rico. "FASEB is pleased to make these factsheets available ... NIH to their state," said FASEB President, Margaret K. ... for biomedical research funding, investing $29.2 billion in ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Mantis shrimp stronger than airplanes 2Mantis shrimp stronger than airplanes 3New electric fish genus and species discovered in Brazil's Rio Negro 2
(Date:1/14/2014)... (PRWEB) January 14, 2014 Date: Friday, April ... Location: Warrington Country Club, 1360 Almshouse Road, Warrington, Pa. ... nonprofit organization solely dedicated to finding a cure for hepatitis ... worldwide, will host its annual Crystal Ball on Friday, April ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... CA (PRWEB) January 14, 2014 Histogen, ... the products of cells grown under simulated embryonic conditions, ... license agreement with Suneva Medical, Inc. for physician-dispensed aesthetic ... , This agreement is an amendment to ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... 2014 As pet owners drew up their lists of New ... "Take better care of my furry companion." Nowadays there are pet ... carrying cases to take the little canine or feline darlings along ... to buy some pricey toys at the pet store. But anyone ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... Texas , Jan. 14, 2014 The ... and research medicinal plants and therapeutic derivatives thereof ... health professionals, and researchers about the challenges of ... http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20100430/DC95601LOGO ) The Society ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Hepatitis B Foundation to Host Annual Crystal Ball Gala 2Histogen and Suneva Medical Expand License for Cell Conditioned Media-based Aesthetic Products Internationally 2Histogen and Suneva Medical Expand License for Cell Conditioned Media-based Aesthetic Products Internationally 3New Year's Resolution: Give Pets the Gift of Top-Notch Health Care 2World's Largest Group of Medicinal Plant Researchers Endorses ABC-AHP-NCNPR Botanical Adulterants Program 2World's Largest Group of Medicinal Plant Researchers Endorses ABC-AHP-NCNPR Botanical Adulterants Program 3World's Largest Group of Medicinal Plant Researchers Endorses ABC-AHP-NCNPR Botanical Adulterants Program 4World's Largest Group of Medicinal Plant Researchers Endorses ABC-AHP-NCNPR Botanical Adulterants Program 5World's Largest Group of Medicinal Plant Researchers Endorses ABC-AHP-NCNPR Botanical Adulterants Program 6World's Largest Group of Medicinal Plant Researchers Endorses ABC-AHP-NCNPR Botanical Adulterants Program 7World's Largest Group of Medicinal Plant Researchers Endorses ABC-AHP-NCNPR Botanical Adulterants Program 8
Cached News: