HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Hopkins scientists overcome main obstacle to making tons of short, drug-like proteins

Two Johns Hopkins scientists have figured out a simple way to make millions upon millions of drug-like peptides quickly and efficiently, overcoming a major hurdle to creating and screening huge "libraries" of these super-short proteins for use in drug development.

"Our work dramatically increases the complexity of peptide libraries that can be created and the speed with which they can be made and processed," says Chuck Merryman, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow who developed the new technique. "In an afternoon, we'll be able to make literally millions of millions of different peptides with medicinal potential."

Usually less than 40 building blocks long, peptides act as important messengers and hormones in the body. But because their building blocks, called amino acids, are quickly recycled, peptides made from the 20 naturally occurring amino acids don't last long enough to be useful as medicines. However, adding a tiny methyl group to each amino acid gives the resulting peptide "drug-like" stability.

Writing in the April 19 issue of Chemistry & Biology, the Hopkins scientists reveal that using a simple chemical reaction, first reported in the early 1980s, allows them to convert en masse the naturally occurring amino acids to ones that form more stable peptides.

The tricky part, Merryman says, was figuring out how to do the conversion while the amino acids were attached to transfer RNA, a carrier molecule required for the biological production of peptides. The advance makes it possible to build upwards of 10,000,000,000,000 -- that's 1 with 13 zeros behind it -- stabilized, 10-block-long peptides at once.

"The idea of creating large peptide libraries and testing them for medicinal uses has been around a long time, but until now it's just not been very practical," says Merryman.

A key aspect of all scientists' efforts to create libraries of drug-like peptides is "biology in a dish" -- harnessing the same machinery cells use
'"/>

Contact: Joanna Downer
jdowner1@jhmi.edu
410-614-5105
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
22-Apr-2004


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Hopkins scientists use blood proteins to detect ovarian cancer
2. Hopkins to found first center for comprehensive study of epigenetics
3. Hopkins Marine Station honored by the American Society for Microbiology
4. Johns Hopkins gene hunters pinpoint new cancer gene target
5. Hopkins researchers identify transplantation antigens among Sioux Indians
6. Hopkins researchers discover how nitric oxide prevents blood vessel inflammation
7. Hopkins is first US institution to obtain powerful genotyping system
8. Dr. Robot tested at Hopkins
9. From Hopkins: Children may outgrow peanut allergies
10. OXiGENE announces launch of ophthalmic clinical trial at The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
11. Hopkins researchers find potential new treatment for children with chronic hepatitis C

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:9/17/2019)... CA (PRWEB) , ... September 17, 2019 , ... ... recently presented at the 27th Series of the Australia Society of Implant Dentistry ... Implant Surgeon’s Perspective,” was part of the Surgical Aspects of Modern Implant Dentistry ...
(Date:9/11/2019)... ... September 09, 2019 , ... Greenberg Traurig, LLP ... David J. Dykeman will speak at DeviceTalks Minnesota, Sept. 9-10, at the Hyatt ... firm’s global Life Sciences & Medical Technology Group have been featured speakers ...
(Date:9/8/2019)... LA JOLLA, Calif. (PRWEB) , ... September 06, ... ... and the Board of Directors of Nanosens Innovations have each authorized the respective ... would become a subsidiary of Cardea, with the Nanosens brand representing a series ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/10/2019)... ... 09, 2019 , ... As World Mental Health Day 2019 ... school students have improved neuro-cognitive executive skills to enhance learning and academics, are ... lifelong social/interpersonal, leadership, problem-solving and coping skills, due to an innovative program called ...
(Date:10/8/2019)... , ... October 08, 2019 , ... ... (TMP), Madhumita Suresh and Leslie Maurer presented company executives with a set of ... Science (MBS) graduates will offer insights from their TMP to a wider audience ...
(Date:10/3/2019)... ... 2019 , ... Today Cereset®, the only proven non-invasive technology ... its randomized research trial for individuals with persisting symptoms following mild-Traumatic Brain Injury ... non-invasive technology which compares tones delivered to a subject’s brain guided by the ...
(Date:10/3/2019)... ... 02, 2019 , ... Murrieta Genomics , the launch pad for genomic ... in Silicon Valley at a special Life Science showcase event on October ... the JJ Lake Business Center located at 340 E. Middlefield Road in Mountain View, ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: