HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Hopkins scientists overcome main obstacle to making tons of short, drug-like proteins

Two Johns Hopkins scientists have figured out a simple way to make millions upon millions of drug-like peptides quickly and efficiently, overcoming a major hurdle to creating and screening huge "libraries" of these super-short proteins for use in drug development.

"Our work dramatically increases the complexity of peptide libraries that can be created and the speed with which they can be made and processed," says Chuck Merryman, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow who developed the new technique. "In an afternoon, we'll be able to make literally millions of millions of different peptides with medicinal potential."

Usually less than 40 building blocks long, peptides act as important messengers and hormones in the body. But because their building blocks, called amino acids, are quickly recycled, peptides made from the 20 naturally occurring amino acids don't last long enough to be useful as medicines. However, adding a tiny methyl group to each amino acid gives the resulting peptide "drug-like" stability.

Writing in the April 19 issue of Chemistry & Biology, the Hopkins scientists reveal that using a simple chemical reaction, first reported in the early 1980s, allows them to convert en masse the naturally occurring amino acids to ones that form more stable peptides.

The tricky part, Merryman says, was figuring out how to do the conversion while the amino acids were attached to transfer RNA, a carrier molecule required for the biological production of peptides. The advance makes it possible to build upwards of 10,000,000,000,000 -- that's 1 with 13 zeros behind it -- stabilized, 10-block-long peptides at once.

"The idea of creating large peptide libraries and testing them for medicinal uses has been around a long time, but until now it's just not been very practical," says Merryman.

A key aspect of all scientists' efforts to create libraries of drug-like peptides is "biology in a dish" -- harnessing the same machinery cells use
'"/>

Contact: Joanna Downer
jdowner1@jhmi.edu
410-614-5105
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
22-Apr-2004


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Hopkins scientists use blood proteins to detect ovarian cancer
2. Hopkins to found first center for comprehensive study of epigenetics
3. Hopkins Marine Station honored by the American Society for Microbiology
4. Johns Hopkins gene hunters pinpoint new cancer gene target
5. Hopkins researchers identify transplantation antigens among Sioux Indians
6. Hopkins researchers discover how nitric oxide prevents blood vessel inflammation
7. Hopkins is first US institution to obtain powerful genotyping system
8. Dr. Robot tested at Hopkins
9. From Hopkins: Children may outgrow peanut allergies
10. OXiGENE announces launch of ophthalmic clinical trial at The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
11. Hopkins researchers find potential new treatment for children with chronic hepatitis C

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:6/11/2019)... ... June 12, 2019 , ... ... discovery services, Abveris plans to leverage the Geneious Biologics platform as a premium ... Chief Technology Officer at Abveris, says: “The Geneious team has done an excellent ...
(Date:6/6/2019)... ... June 05, 2019 , ... Ziegler, ... financial advisor to Pathologists Bio-Medical Laboratories (PBM) on its recent acquisition by PathGroup. ... platform that provides services to more than one dozen hospitals and surgery centers ...
(Date:6/4/2019)... ... 04, 2019 , ... Most preclinical EEG visualization platforms offer ... usually based on variations of amplitude, frequency or spike train detection. In the ... to the complexity and variability of the signal, and automation tools are used ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/7/2019)... British Columbia (PRWEB) , ... May 06, 2019 ... ... be a go-to resource for the growing number of repositories being asked to ... We are grateful to the team of contributors who are world leaders, who ...
(Date:5/2/2019)... ... , ... Stay on top of current hot topics through free webinars presented ... webinars is free, so be sure to register today to save your place! Participate ... to see our upcoming webinars: , CLINICAL TRIALS , May 7 – Oncology Clinical ...
(Date:4/18/2019)... ... 18, 2019 , ... Taking a step closer to a ... at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a novel process using an unusual ... and other biofuels more economically. , Isobutanol, like ethanol, is an alcohol, but ...
(Date:4/10/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... April 10, ... ... both regenerative medicine manufacturing technology leaders, have locked into multiple agreements to ... before. Companies across the regenerative medicine industry, ranging from synthetic biology companies ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: