HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Hypothermia helps brain heal after cardiac arrest, finds University of Pittsburgh study

BOSTON, May 30 Cooling body temperature to levels consistent with hypothermia improves survival when induced after cardiac arrest and also promotes growth factors important for the brains recovery, suggests a study performed by researchers in the department of emergency medicine at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Preliminary results of their study were reported today at the 2003 Annual Meeting of the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) in Boston.

Although the study involved animals, the findings already had an influence on the management of cardiac arrest patients being treated at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), where the lead researcher is also a practicing emergency medicine physician.

Cardiac arrest is the sudden, abrupt loss of heart function. Death usually occurs within minutes unless cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and rapid defibrillation is available. As cardiac arrest progresses, blood flow to the brain ceases. If a patient survives long enough to make it to the hospital, the patient often will be in a coma and at risk of permanent brain injury. In fact, less than 10 percent of patients make it through the chain-of-survival (early access to care, early CPR, early defibrillation and early advanced care). The Pitt researchers sought to find out if hypothermia treatment played a role in survival from cardiac arrest and brain recovery.

In animal studies, the researchers found that when the animals were cooled to 33 degrees Celsius (91.4 degrees Fahrenheit) beginning one hour after cardiac arrest, there was 100 percent survival, whereas 75 percent of the animals left at normal temperature of 37C (98.6F) survived. Furthermore, microscopic brain injury was reduced by half, and some animals showed functional improvement in as little as 12 hours after cardiac arrest was induced. Conversely, the animals left at normal temperature after cardiac arrest showed little or no functional improveme
'"/>

Contact: Maureen McGaffin
412-647-3555
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
30-May-2003


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Atacama rover helps NASA learn to search for life on Mars
2. Reducing allergens in the home helps inner-city children with asthma
3. As informatics grows, Indiana University helps set research agenda
4. New diagnostic technology helps justify earlier cataract surgery
5. New technique helps scientists reveal interactions between genes and drugs
6. Living at home helps young mothers stay in school
7. Hormone helps fish to mate, may affect human hearing
8. Harmless virus helps slow HIV by boosting immune proteins
9. Study helps explain island populations susceptibility to exotic diseases
10. Utah scientist helps discover new mouse species -- and maybe a new genus
11. Choice of food helps hungry caterpillar

Post Your Comments:
(Date:7/28/2014)... Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard ... will be commercialized by a newly formed private ... and personalized medicine products. The announcement ... of Technology Development (OTD) and the start-up Emulate ... automated human Organs-on-Chips platform. , "This is ...
(Date:7/27/2014)... that nicotine and cotinine, a metabolite of nicotine, can ... in smoke. , The carcinogen 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone or NNK is ... ends up in the tobacco smoke. Once inhaled, it ... is activated by a variety of enzymes called Cytochrome ... nicotine can partially interfere with the activation of NNK, ...
(Date:7/27/2014)... of mayfly in the southern Western Ghats, a mountain range ... the first time that any mayfly belonging to the genus ... The new species, called Labiobaetis soldani , "is named ... to the understanding of the Ephemeroptera of Palaearctic and Oriental ... the new mayfly in the Journal of Insect Science ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Wyss Institute's technology translation engine launches 'Organs-on-Chips' company 2Wyss Institute's technology translation engine launches 'Organs-on-Chips' company 3Nicotine found to inhibit DNA-strand break caused by a certain carcinogen in smoke 2
(Date:7/28/2014)... , July 28, 2014 Sapphire Energy, ... today announced the appointment of biotechnology veteran James ... board of directors. Levine replaces Cynthia ,CJ, Warner, who ... will remain chairman of the company,s board of directors. ... Energy,s mission to deliver commercial scale algae-based fuels has ...
(Date:7/28/2014)... 2014 “2014 Deep Research ... is a professional and in-depth research report ... report introduces Lubricant basic information, including Lubricant ... and industry overview. This research covers the ... as well as global industry analysis covering ...
(Date:7/28/2014)... Junction, MD (PRWEB) July 28, 2014 ... in personalized medicine, will be exhibiting data and research ... year’s International Spine Intervention Society’s (ISIS) 22nd ... 30th-August 3rd, at the Hyatt Regency, in Orlando, Florida. ... the knowledge and clinical competence of physicians who care ...
(Date:7/28/2014)...   JOLT , a leading technology accelerator, announced today ... portfolio of startups. Next-level tech and boundary-pushing innovation have ... accelerator, and Cohort four is no exception, with six ... its launch in July 2012, JOLT has produced 17 ... at 23 investments, JOLT,s portfolio has an overall mix ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Sapphire Energy Announces New CEO James Levine 2Sapphire Energy Announces New CEO James Levine 3Lubricant Market & Adhesion Promoter Industry (Globa, China) Analysis Now Available at DeepResearchReports.com 2Lubricant Market & Adhesion Promoter Industry (Globa, China) Analysis Now Available at DeepResearchReports.com 3Lubricant Market & Adhesion Promoter Industry (Globa, China) Analysis Now Available at DeepResearchReports.com 4Proove Biosciences Exhibits Industry Leading Data and Research at International Spine Intervention Society’s 22nd Annual Scientific Meeting 2JOLT Announces the Next 6 Startups to Join its Summer 2014 Cohort 2JOLT Announces the Next 6 Startups to Join its Summer 2014 Cohort 3
Cached News: