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Improvement in some patients who underwent neuronal transplantation following stroke, according to study by University of Pittsburgh researchers

e patients had no change from their baseline scores and three patients deteriorated slightly. Six patients improved from one to eight points on the motor component of ESS with four patients improving six points or more.

"The changes in performance on the motor function of each of these scales accounted for the majority of improvement noted," reported Dr. Kondziolka. "Functional improvement appeared to be independent of the time interval since occurrence of the strokes. Increases in cerebral glucose metabolism as measured by PET scanning appeared to correlate with functional improvement."

The implanted human neuronal cells are provided by Layton BioScience, Inc., located in Atherton, Calif. LBS-Neurons originate from a human teratocarcinoma, a tumor of the reproductive organs that is composed of embryonic-like cells, removed from a 22-year-old cancer patient in the early 1980s. Layton BioScience, Inc., has licensed a patented process that uses several chemicals to transform this cell line into fully differentiated non-dividing human neuronal cells (LBS-Neurons) that can be used in clinical applications. In extensive preclinical testing, implants of LBS-Neurons reversed cognitive and motor deficits in animals in which stroke had been induced.

The procedure begins with the placement of a stereotactic frame on the head of the patient. The frame is a standard tool in neurosurgery to provide a fixed way to find specific locations within the brain. The patient then receives a CT or MRI scan of the brain and the surgical team makes its final decision for location of cell implantation.

Concurrently, the University of Pittsburgh Immunologic Monitoring and Diagnostic Laboratory team thaws the human neuronal cells that were frozen by and transported from Layton BioScience, Inc.

After the cells are transferred to a long-needled syringe, the surgeon uses CT to guide their injection at multiple sites. The surgeon injects t
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Contact: Frank Raczkiewicz
raczkiewiczfa@msx.upmc.edu
412-624-2607
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
10-Apr-2000


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