HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Johns Hopkins scientists create forgetful mouse

Studying mice, scientists from Johns Hopkins have successfully prevented a molecular event in brain cells that they've found is required for storing spatial memories. Unlike regular mice, the engineered rodents quickly forgot where to find a resting place in a pool of water, the researchers report in the March 7 issue of the journal Cell.

The experiments are believed to be the first to prove that subtly altering the chemistry of a certain protein can profoundly affect a brain cell's ability to respond to external stimulation, a process called neuronal plasticity, long thought to underlie learning and memory.

By genetically altering part of a receptor that binds glutamate -- the most important excitatory chemical in the brain -- the scientists created a version of the protein that could not be modified by adding phosphate groups. In their experiments, preventing phosphorylation of the receptor kept it from responding normally to external stimulation in the lab and limited how long animals could store new memories.

"Since 1986, phosphorylation has been recognized as a key to modulating receptor responses to neurotransmitters like glutamate, but this is the first demonstration that phosphorylation of a particular target protein mediates the processes we believe are behind learning and memory," says Richard Huganir, Ph.D., professor of neuroscience in the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine's Institute for Basic Biomedical Sciences. "This new work shows that phosphorylation of this target protein does indeed affect an animal's ability to remember."

Mice with the "phosphate-free" version of the protein, known as GluR1, learned to find a hidden platform in a pool of water as well as normal mice, but couldn't remember its position eight hours later, the researchers report. In contrast, normal mice remembered what they'd learned even after 24 hours.

"Rodents' spatial learning and memory is highly developed because they must navigat
'"/>

Contact: Joanna Downer
jdowner1@jhmi.edu
410-614-5105
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
7-Mar-2003


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Yale professor receives Johnson & Johnson Focused Giving award
2. Marian Johnson-Thompson wins 2004 Alice C. Evans Award
3. Conservation International & SC Johnson invest in Ecuadors rainforest to offset climate impacts
4. Johns Hopkins gene hunters pinpoint new cancer gene target
5. OXiGENE announces launch of ophthalmic clinical trial at The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
6. Johns Hopkins receives $24 million from Donald W. Reynolds Foundation to study sudden cardiac death
7. Johns Hopkins researchers devise methods to evaluate disaster drills
8. A bed of microneedles: Johns Hopkins scientists gadget measures muscle cell force
9. Wake Forest-Johns Hopkins team discovers prostate cancer gene
10. The next generation of scientists recognized at Johns Hopkins
11. Johns Hopkins scientists find brains nose plug

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Johns Hopkins scientists create forgetful mouse

(Date:4/17/2014)... Orange, NJ. April 16, 2014. Kessler Foundation has ... $1.8 million from the Department of Defense Spinal ... is principal investigator for the randomized, double-blinded, controlled, ... improve bone and muscle strength after spinal cord ... Performance & Engineering Research at Kessler Foundation. Two ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... N.M. A credit-card-sized anthrax detection cartridge developed at ... business makes testing safer, easier, faster and cheaper. ... anthrax, is commonly found in soils all over the ... in both humans and animals. The bacteria can survive ... B. anthracis may occur through skin contact, ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... Kansas State University engineer has developed a patented ... improvised explosive devices. The same technique could help ... Steven M. and Kay L. Theede chair in ... engineering, and his research team have created a ... in car trunks. The distance detection method ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Kessler Foundation awarded Department of Defense grant for spinal cord injury research 2Pocket-sized anthrax detector aids global agriculture 2Pocket-sized anthrax detector aids global agriculture 3Patented research remotely detects nitrogen-rich explosives 2
(Date:1/15/2014)... IPSWICH, England , January 15, 2014 ... to win races on the Formula 1 track could help ... between McLaren Applied Technologies (MAT), Stowhealth (a GP surgery based ... funded by healthcare provider Simplyhealth. Telemetry technology, which ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... January 15, 2014 2013 was a ... Brain State Technologies®. They saw continued independent research led ... who were awarded a $1 million grant from the ... “Brain and Behavior” a peer reviewed journal, Amy Grant ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... Carahsoft and CDS Federal Services have ... at 2pm EST (11am PST), “Natural Language Processing: Converting ... how technology can turn raw, heterogeneous data into actionable ... The online webinar will last approximately one hour. , ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... 2014 The largest international professional organization of ... therapeutic derivatives thereof has endorsed an educational program ... the challenges of adulterated herb and botanical products. ... The Society for Medicinal Plant and Natural ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Formula 1 Technology Tackles Obesity in Unique Healthcare Partnership 2Formula 1 Technology Tackles Obesity in Unique Healthcare Partnership 3Formula 1 Technology Tackles Obesity in Unique Healthcare Partnership 4Dynamic Innovative Technology Showcased at Scottsdale Company’s Open House 2Dynamic Innovative Technology Showcased at Scottsdale Company’s Open House 3Webcast - Natural Language Processing: Converting Raw Data into Actionable Knowledge – Hosted by Carahsoft and CDS Federal Services 2World's Largest Group of Medicinal Plant Researchers Endorses ABC-AHP-NCNPR Botanical Adulterants Program 2World's Largest Group of Medicinal Plant Researchers Endorses ABC-AHP-NCNPR Botanical Adulterants Program 3World's Largest Group of Medicinal Plant Researchers Endorses ABC-AHP-NCNPR Botanical Adulterants Program 4World's Largest Group of Medicinal Plant Researchers Endorses ABC-AHP-NCNPR Botanical Adulterants Program 5World's Largest Group of Medicinal Plant Researchers Endorses ABC-AHP-NCNPR Botanical Adulterants Program 6World's Largest Group of Medicinal Plant Researchers Endorses ABC-AHP-NCNPR Botanical Adulterants Program 7World's Largest Group of Medicinal Plant Researchers Endorses ABC-AHP-NCNPR Botanical Adulterants Program 8
Cached News: