HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Junk DNA yields new kind of gene

BOSTON-In a region of DNA long considered a genetic wasteland, Harvard Medical School researchers have discovered a new class of gene. Most genes carry out their tasks by making a product-a protein or enzyme. This is true of those that provide the body's raw materials, the structural genes, and those that control other genes' activities, the regulatory genes. The new one, found in yeast, does not produce a protein. It performs its function, in this case to regulate a nearby gene, simply by being turned on.

Joseph Martens, Lisa Laprade, and Fred Winston found that by switching on the new gene, they could stop the neighboring structural gene from being expressed. "It is the active transcription of another gene that is regulating the process," said Martens, HMS research fellow in genetics and lead author of the June 3 Nature study .

"I cannot think of another regulatory gene such as this one," said Winston, HMS professor of genetics. The researchers have evidence that the new gene, SRG1, works by physically blocking transcription of the adjacent gene, SER3. They found that transcription of SRG1 prevents the binding of a critical piece of SER3's transcriptional machinery.

The discovery raises tantalizing questions. How does this gene-blocking occur? Do other regulatory genes work in this fashion? Does the same mechanism occur in mammals, including humans?

At the same time, SRG1 provides clues to a recent puzzle. Researchers have lately begun to suspect that the long stretches of apparently useless, or junk, DNA might possess a hidden function. In the past year, evidence has been pouring in, not just from yeast but from mammals, that these apparently silent regions produce RNAs, which are associated with transcriptional activity (see Focus, March 5, 2004 http://focus.hms.harvard.edu/2004/March5_2004/biological_chemistry.html). Yet no one has found associa
'"/>

Contact: Judith Montminy / Misia Landau
public_affairs@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0442
Harvard Medical School
2-Jun-2004


Page: 1 2 3 4

Related biology news :

1. Alaska scientists find Arctic tundra yields surprising carbon loss
2. Heart gene yields insights into evolution, disease risk
3. A genetic disorder yields insight into genes and cognition
4. Two-month study of life in mid-Atlantic yields trove of species, new insights & questions
5. Whale carcass yields bone-devouring worms
6. Study yields insights into precancerous condition
7. Water study yields a few surprises for New England
8. Access to DNA secrets yields better understanding of genes, possible tool for disease diagnosis
9. Mouse study yields clue to why liver is less prone to rejection, say Pitt researchers
10. Microbial biofilm yields community genomes, metabolic clues
11. Map of genes in plant root yields new tool for exploring tissue development

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Junk DNA yields new kind gene

(Date:10/16/2014)... be cultivated efficiently, they are anything but sustainable: ... monoculture cultivation is becoming increasingly evident. Despite their ... and are regarded as the sole possibility of ... wrongfully, finds Bernhard Schmid, an ecology professor at ... form of agriculture and forestry. After all, a ...
(Date:10/15/2014)... PORT WASHINGTON, N.Y. , Oct. 15, 2014 ... in technology solutions for home and community-based care, ... the benefits of implementing Sandata,s Santrax® Electronic Visit ... Quality Care Services is a home health company ... Texas . ...
(Date:10/15/2014)... spreading rapidly and to an unexpected extent. The outbreak ... and the virus shows a new disease dynamic in ... this reason, the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, ... and the Union of the German Academies of Sciences ... epidemic today. , In the statement the academies call ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Plant communities produce greater yield than monocultures 2Plant communities produce greater yield than monocultures 3Sandata Announces Case Study with Quality Care Services, Inc. 2Academies call for consequences from the Ebola virus epidemic 2Academies call for consequences from the Ebola virus epidemic 3Academies call for consequences from the Ebola virus epidemic 4Academies call for consequences from the Ebola virus epidemic 5
(Date:10/22/2014)... 22, 2014 Grace Century, a private ... projects, announces the addition of Dr. Yousef “Josh” ... advisory team. Dr. Siddiqui will provide further healthcare expertise ... graduate of University College Medical School in ... medicine in 2001. With further certification as a General ...
(Date:10/22/2014)... , Oct. 22, 2014 /PRNewswire/ - iCo Therapeutics ("iCo" ... announced next steps for its Oral Amphotericin B ... its in vitro work involving samples ... now plans to complete pre clinical studies and ... Phase 1A clinical trial, utilizing approximately $700,000 of ...
(Date:10/20/2014)... (PRWEB) October 20, 2014 The ... (Medication Dispensing Systems, Packaging and Labeling Systems, Table-top ... Automation) - Global Forecasts & Trends to 2019” ... and opportunities in North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, and ... 101 market tables and 30 figures spread through ...
(Date:10/20/2014)... /PRNewswire/ - BIOREM Inc. (TSXV: BRM) ("Biorem" or "the Company") today ... to $5.8 million and provides a good start to Q4.  The ... America and one in the Middle East ... record levels," said Peter Bruijns , President & CEO. "Total ... Q3 than they have been for any complete year since the ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Dr. Yousef Siddiqui joins the Grace Century Advisory Team 2iCo Therapeutics Announces Advancement of Oral Amphotericin B Program 2iCo Therapeutics Announces Advancement of Oral Amphotericin B Program 3Pharmacy Automation Systems Market worth $4,566.2 Million by 2019 - New Research Report by MarketsandMarkets 2Pharmacy Automation Systems Market worth $4,566.2 Million by 2019 - New Research Report by MarketsandMarkets 3Pharmacy Automation Systems Market worth $4,566.2 Million by 2019 - New Research Report by MarketsandMarkets 4
Cached News: