HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Making a friendlier mosquito

Genetically modified mosquitoes that cannot transmit malaria are one hope for battling the disease that still kills over one million people a year. But that plan faces some serious snags, according to UC Davis researchers who are suggesting an alternative strategy.

Other scientists have proposed controlling malaria by releasing into the wild mosquitoes genetically engineered to resist malaria. If the resistant mosquitoes breed and spread their genes through the population, malaria transmission should be shut down. The malaria parasite depends entirely on female Anopheles mosquitoes to spread from person to person.

That plan faces two problems, say postdoctoral researcher Matthew Hahn and Sergey Nuzhdin, a professor of evolution and ecology at UC Davis. First, the malaria resistance genes available are not very effective. Second, there's no way to reliably push the genes through the population.

To put genes into an insect, scientists use a mobile piece of DNA called a transposon. Transposons are essentially DNA parasites that snip themselves in or out of the genome under the right circumstances. Scientists can add a new gene into a transposon and use it to carry that DNA into the insect genome. But it's in the interest of that transposon to just get rid of the extra DNA, Hahn said.

Hahn and Nuzhdin propose an alternative strategy. They suggest designing a transposon that gives an advantage to mosquitoes that already carry genes to block malaria, so that those genes spread through the population by natural selection.

The genetic engineering work involved is challenging but should be possible, Hahn said.

The work is published in the April 6 issue of the journal Current Biology.


'"/>

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis
20-Apr-2004


Page: 1

Related biology news :

1. Making sense of the brains mind-boggling complexity
2. Making protein nanostructures
3. Making the most of stem cells
4. Making of mouse marks move toward mitochondrial medicine
5. Making new muscle: Researchers in Rome produce a mouse that can regenerate its tissues
6. Making sense of bacterial biodiversity
7. Making sense of the genome
8. Making a safer anthrax vaccine using spinach
9. A new twist on an age-old problem: Making knee replacements last
10. Making sense of Marfan syndrome
11. Making the most of lymphopenia

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:9/30/2019)... ... September 30, 2019 , ... ... and leading supplier of innovative human mesenchymal stem/stromal cell (hMSC) biomanufacturing systems, ... formulations related to “Ready-to-Print” (RTP) cellular product formats (patent number AU 2015259373). ...
(Date:9/25/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... September 25, 2019 , ... ... is pleased to announce it ranked No. 3094 on Inc. Magazine’s annual Inc. ... Solutions reported three-year revenue growth of 120 percent. Based on this growth, the ...
(Date:9/24/2019)... Hungary and CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (PRWEB) , ... September ... ... in Budapest with US offices in Cambridge, MA, announce today that Holotype HLA ... presentation at the annual meeting of the American Society for Histocompatibility and ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:9/24/2019)... ... September 24, 2019 , ... ... technologies, development, and manufacturing solutions for drugs, biologics, gene therapies, and consumer ... focused on the development of therapies to treat central nervous system (CNS) ...
(Date:9/24/2019)... ... September 24, 2019 , ... The Grain Foods ... its Scientific Advisory Board. Dr. Holscher is an Assistant Professor of Nutrition in ... Sciences at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, where she has affiliate appointments with ...
(Date:9/22/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... September 20, 2019 , ... ... launch of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) testing in serum . BDNF plays ... systems. BDNF stimulates the growth and differentiation of new neurons in the brain ...
(Date:9/17/2019)... , ... September 17, 2019 , ... Tucker, a Labrador ... only four months old, Tucker was limping and lame on his right hip and ... dysplasia and it was called “the worst case the vet had seen.” He was ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: