HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Microbes active in Colorado snows fuel tundra ecosystem

Arlington, Va.--Populations of fungi blanketed by Colorado's snows are more active and diverse than previously thought, and are likely responsible for the productivity of the tundra ecosystem they are a part of, according to findings by scientists funded through the National Science Foundation (NSF)'s Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) and Microbial Observatories programs. The researchers have published their results in this week's issue of the journal Science.

Christopher Schadt, now of the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee and a former graduate student at the University of Colorado at Boulder, said "the discovery should help scientists gain greater insight into decomposition rates, carbon cycles and the roles of individual fungi in those processes." Surprisingly, the number of active microorganisms in tundra soils, for at least the top 10 centimeters, (about four inches) peaks when the soils are covered with snow. Schadt and colleagues performed their research at the Niwot Ridge, Colo., LTER site. Niwot Ridge is located some 12,000 feet atop the Rocky Mountains.

"The finding that microorganisms are interacting with tundra soils to a great extent highlights the important role of the snowpack in creating a unique and crucial environment in tundra ecosystems in Colorado and likely in other locations that are covered with snow for long periods of time in winter," said Henry Gholz, LTER program director at NSF.

Metabolism of snow-covered microbes is an important biogeochemical "sink," or way of storing, nitrogen. "The subsequent release in spring of nitrogen from the microbes' metabolism is a major contributor to the relatively high productivity during the short growing season in the tundra," said Steven Schmidt of the University of Colorado at Boulder, a co-author of the Science paper, and leader of the research team.

Schadt, Schmidt, and colleagues Andrew Martin of the University of Colorad
'"/>

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation
4-Sep-2003


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Microbes eat their way to better concrete
2. Microbes found in Mayan ruins may deteriorate stone from inside out
3. Microbes blueprints promise insights into oceans, more
4. Microbes related to infant lung infections reduced using specialized ventilation system device
5. Microbes and the dust they ride in on pose potential health risks
6. "Microbes deep within South African gold mines" subject of NSF lecture
7. Microbes make mine-waste drinkable, Science researchers report
8. Microbes on Earth may be key to identifying life on other planets
9. Microbes in basalt thrive on mixed diet of toxic waste
10. Microbes work magic on hazardous air pollutants
11. Chemical Reaction Believed To Support Underground Microbes Is Now Unlikely

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Microbes active Colorado snows fuel tundra ecosystem

(Date:11/21/2014)... SAN JOSE, Calif. , Nov. 20, 2014 /PRNewswire/ ... a global leader in microcontroller (MCU) and touch technology ... digital temperature sensors with the widest V ... family delivers higher temperature accuracy and faster I 2 ... nonvolatile registers and serial EEPROM memory making them ideal ...
(Date:11/18/2014)... 2014 The Parenteral Drug Association (PDA) today confirmed ... speak and at least seven more will participate in the ... Shoreham Hotel in Washington D.C. , Dec. ... significant support from the regulatory agencies in the ... in our effort to help advance the use of metrics ...
(Date:11/12/2014)... 12, 2014 Crossmatch™, a leading provider of ... ® fingerprint readers have been deployed throughout Montparnasse ... Central Mexico . The bakery chain implemented the ... issues caused by employees clocking in for each other. ... readers, Montparnasse relied on paper timecards and a mechanical ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Atmel Launches Industry's First Wide-V(cc) Low-Power Temperature Sensor Family 2Atmel Launches Industry's First Wide-V(cc) Low-Power Temperature Sensor Family 3Atmel Launches Industry's First Wide-V(cc) Low-Power Temperature Sensor Family 4FDA's Janet Woodcock, EMA's Emer Cooke Headline PDA Quality Metrics Conference 2Montparnasse Pasteleria Achieves Time and Attendance Transparency with Crossmatch U.are.U Fingerprint Readers 2
(Date:11/26/2014)... 2014 The ETC (Emerging Technology ... innovation centers, announced today that applications for AccelerateBaltimore™ ... 1st. “Do you have a big idea?,” asked ... to know about it. AccelerateBaltimore helps you and ... in just 13 weeks.” Interested game changers ...
(Date:11/26/2014)... CA (PRWEB) November 25, 2014 Silicon ... joins forces with RPM Alliance , provider of ... pharmaceutical companies. With the latest addition to its CRO ... free validated EDC system to India. , “We ... a robust and customizable EDC platform which is both ...
(Date:11/26/2014)... 25, 2014 Miles Holder, formerly of ... Graphel Carbon Products team as Sales/Marketing Manager. Mr. Holder ... customer service for the graphite industry. , “We are ... team,” stated Dave Trinkley, VP of Market and Product ... of experience in the graphite industry, along with his ...
(Date:11/26/2014)... Theravalues Corporation est fier d,annoncer le ... au salon Hi Europe 2014 (du 2 au ... Curcumine la plus biodisponible actuellement sur le ... des ingrédients approuvés par les règlements européens. ... dans la racine de curcuma ( Curcuma longa ...
Breaking Biology Technology:AccelerateBaltimore Applications to Close in 6 Days 2AccelerateBaltimore Applications to Close in 6 Days 3RPM Alliance Joins Clinovo’s CRO Partnership Program, Further Strengthening Its Presence in Southern California and India 2Miles Holder Joins Graphel Corporation as Sales/Marketing Manager 2La curcumine présentant la plus haute biodisponibilité bientôt en vente en Europe 2La curcumine présentant la plus haute biodisponibilité bientôt en vente en Europe 3
Cached News: