HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Molecular image of genotoxin reveals how bacteria damage human DNA

might induce cell cycle arrest because it stops cells from being sloughed off in areas such as the intestines where bacteria seek to make a home.

"CDT may also act as an immunosuppressant," says Stebbins, "since the immune system requires cell division to respond to microbial infection."

There are nearly 10 different species of disease-causing bacteria that use CDT, including Salmonella typhi, a bacteria that causes typhoid fever; Haemophilus ducreyi, a bacteria that causes genital ulcers; Campylobacter jejuni, a common cause of food poisoning; certain strains of Escherichia coli that cause diarrhea, and a host of other pathogenic bacteria.

"More CDT-containing bacteria are discovered each year," says Stebbins, "Many of these bacteria cause very different kinds of diseases and colonize different tissues. But they all have CDT. To me, that argues that it's playing an important role."

Stebbins' structure of CDT visually confirms that this genotoxin is made up of three subunits, including one called CdtB that cleaves, or cuts, DNA.

According to Stebbins' model, the three-unit toxin contains a long, deep groove, a cluster of ring-shaped molecules, called the "aromatic patch," and a dangling protein tail that can block a key portion of the CdtB subunit that is necessary for DNA cleavage.

"We're not sure what the role of the cleavage-blocking protein tail is, but the structure helps us to understand how to interact with the active site of CdtB to impair its activity, which could give us some ideas for achieving the same thing with a drug molecule," said Stebbins.

Armed with an atomic model of a protein, scientists can program computers to screen virtual representations of millions of compounds to see if they have a good chance of interacting with the target. Compounds are narrowed down to a selected few, which are then tested to determine how well they interact with the drug target. By screening compounds by comput
'"/>


26-May-2004


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Molecular motor implicated in tissue remodeling
2. 16th EORTC NCI AACR Symposium Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
3. 16th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
4. Molecular staples shape a cancer killer
5. Molecular motor myosin VI moves hand over hand, researchers say
6. Molecular therapeutics advance fight against brain cancer
7. Molecular motor shuttles key protein in response to light
8. Molecular traffic cop directs cellular signals
9. Molecular marker predicts success of breast cancer treatment
10. Molecular mechanism found that may improve ability of stem cells to fight disease
11. Molecular midwives hold clues to the origin of life

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:8/4/2019)... ... 02, 2019 , ... Stay on top of current hot topics through free ... to all webinars is free, so be sure to register today to save your ... http://www.xtalks.com to see our upcoming webinars: , CLINICAL OPERATIONS , August 27 – ...
(Date:8/1/2019)... ... July 31, 2019 , ... Molecular ... launch of the next generation of its FLIPR® Penta High-Throughput Cellular Screening System. ... FLIPR® platform for monitoring of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and ion channels, offering a ...
(Date:7/24/2019)... ... July 24, 2019 , ... NDA Partners Chairman Carl ... with more than 20 years of experience working in scientific research and FDA-regulated ... as an Expert Consultant. , Dr. Hartzfeld has experience in all aspects of ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:8/14/2019)... STATE COLLEGE, Pa. (PRWEB) , ... August 13, ... ... leader in nuclear receptor and in vitro toxicology testing solutions, announced the appointment ... of healthcare industry experience to the Board. , Mark McLoughlin will lend his ...
(Date:8/6/2019)... ... 06, 2019 , ... The San Diego Biotechnology Network (SDBN) ... SDBN BUZZ podcast focused on connecting the region’s biotech community and discussing topics ... the region and attract external employers, investors, scientists, and others who wish to ...
(Date:8/4/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... August 02, 2019 , ... Cirtec Medical ... invasive devices, today announced that it has begun construction on a 30,000 sq. ft. ... 15 miles from San Jose. , The facility, which is expected to be ...
(Date:7/19/2019)... ... July 18, 2019 , ... Global precision motion and ... current piezo motion facilities in Lederhose, Germany, increasing their current footprint by half ... assembly production in addition to general office space, a significant increase to its ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: