HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Molecular mechanism found that may improve ability of stem cells to fight disease

PITTSBURGH, May 3 Adult stem cell transplantation offers great therapeutic potential for a variety of diseases due to their ability to replenish diseased cells and tissue. While they are unique in this ability, it remains a challenge to effectively treat disease long-term with stem cells because of our inability to grow them in the laboratory. Defining the molecular switch in the stem cell replication process, or cell cycle, is a key step to stimulating their growth for broader clinical use.

In the May issue of Nature Cell Biology, Tao Cheng, M.D., assistant professor, department of radiation oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, and colleagues report the discovery of a molecular mechanism in the cell cycle that appears to impact the replicating ability of stem cells from bone marrow and blood to fight disease. They found that blood stem cells from mice missing a gene called p18 were much better able to multiply and grow. p18 is a molecule in a class of so-called "cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors" that are critical inhibitors of cell cycle control.

In the study, Dr. Cheng and his team isolated p18-deficient stem cells from mice and found that these cells were much more efficient at repopulating injured bone marrow tissue. As a result, they concluded that blocking the function of p18 may be a productive way to enhance the efficacy of stem cell transplantation as a treatment for diseases.

"Stem cells have great potential, but we need to develop novel strategies to help them proliferate to better fight diseases," said Dr. Cheng, also stem cell biologist at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute. "By using stem cells deficient in p18, we found a strikingly improved long-term engraftment of stem cells in bone marrow leading us to the conclusion that p18 is a strong inhibitor to stem cell self-renewal. This is an exciting finding because it may lead to a new medical invention that can improve the ability of stem
'"/>

Contact: Clare Collins
CollCX@upmc.edu
412-647-3555
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
3-May-2004


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Molecular motor implicated in tissue remodeling
2. 16th EORTC NCI AACR Symposium Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
3. 16th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
4. Molecular staples shape a cancer killer
5. Molecular motor myosin VI moves hand over hand, researchers say
6. Molecular therapeutics advance fight against brain cancer
7. Molecular motor shuttles key protein in response to light
8. Molecular traffic cop directs cellular signals
9. Molecular marker predicts success of breast cancer treatment
10. Molecular image of genotoxin reveals how bacteria damage human DNA
11. Molecular midwives hold clues to the origin of life

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:5/6/2017)... -- RAM Group , Singaporean based technology ... biometric authentication based on a novel  quantum-state ... perform biometric authentication. These new sensors are based on a ... Group and its partners. This sensor will have widespread ... security. Ram Group is a next generation sensor ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... 18, 2017  Socionext Inc., a global expert in SoC-based imaging ... server, the M820, which features the company,s hybrid codec technology. A ... Tera Probe, Inc., will be showcased during the upcoming Medtec Japan ... at the Las Vegas Convention Center April ... Click here for ...
(Date:4/13/2017)... According to a new market research report "Consumer ... Administration, and Authorization), Service, Authentication Type, Deployment Mode, Vertical, and Region - ... to grow from USD 14.30 Billion in 2017 to USD 31.75 Billion ... ... MarketsandMarkets Logo ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... , ... October 11, 2017 , ... ... announced today it will be hosting a Webinar titled, “Pathology is going digital. ... Associates , on digital pathology adoption best practices and how Proscia improves lab ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... ... Disappearing forests and increased emissions are the main causes of the evolving ... those living in larger cities are affected by air pollution related diseases. , That ... countries globally - decided to take action. , “I knew I had to take ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... , ... October 10, 2017 , ... San Diego-based team ... its corporate rebranding initiative announced today. The bold new look is part of ... the company moves into a significant growth period. , It will also expand its ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... 10, 2017 , ... Dr. Bob Harman, founder and CEO of VetStem ... The event entitled “Stem Cells and Their Regenerative Powers,” was held ... Harman, DVM, MPVM was joined by two human doctors: Peter B. Hanson, M.D., Chief ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: