HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Montana State University Scientist Contributes To Latest Dinosaur Discovery

BOZEMAN, MONT.--A Bozeman, Mont., woman took particular notice of recent news that scientists had found a rare dinosaur embryo in the Patagonia region of Argentina.

Frankie Jackson, a research associate in the Museum of the Rockies and earth sciences department at Montana State University-Bozeman, is one of six scientists who described the discovery in the Nov. 19 issue of the journal Nature.

Photographs from the expedition appear in the December issue of National Geographic.

The Nature paper tells of rare embryos from a dinosaur nesting site covered with thousands of eggs over about one square mile. Jackson helped confirm that the fossilized embryos belong to sauropods--huge plant-eating dinosaurs like Apatosaurus, which used to be called Brontosaurus.

"I think this is a very exciting discovery. Extremely important," said Museum of the Rockies paleontologist Jack Horner.

Dinosaur embryos are rare, he said. Only six others have been found throughout the world.

"The exciting thing about this is we finally have identifiable embryonic remains inside an egg," said Jackson.

Scientists have identified sauropod eggs based on bones found in the same sediments as the eggs, but that method hasn't been accurate, she added.

It's also the first embryo retrieved from the Southern Hemisphere and the first to contain fossilized skin from baby dinosaurs.

Jackson was not on the expedition last spring that initially discovered the 70 million- to 90-million-year-old egg site. Scientists from the American Museum of Natural History in New York and Argentina's Museo Municipal Carmen Funes found the nesting ground where thousands of dinosaurs may have gathered to lay their eggs.

American Museum paleontologist Luis Chiappe contacted Jackson after learning from a colleague that she studies fossilized egg shells. Chiappe asked her to join the project and desc
'"/>

Contact: Annette Trinity-Stevens
avrats@montana.edu
406-994-5607
Montana State University
25-Nov-1998


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Dinosaur discoveries in Montana
2. Society for Vertebrate Paleontology to hold annual meeting in Montana in October
3. Montana State University begins major trout and salmonid book collection
4. Montana drought sends paleontologists to field early for largest project in states history
5. Montana researcher co-authors Science article on Niger dinosaurs
6. Montana Hantavirus Study Looks At Why The Mouse Goes Into The House
7. Sandia, University Of Montana Researchers Try Training Bees To Find Buried Landmines
8. Montana Scientist Returns From Dinosaur Nesting Site In Patagonia
9. Montana And Other Scientists Report On Life In The Ice
10. Largest Tyrannosaur Fossil Unearthed In Montana
11. New Arizona State center brings science to policy on issues of water resources and urban growth

Post Your Comments:
(Date:7/31/2014)... tuna movements in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean led by ... at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, found among other ... with pronounced north-south movements from Georges Bank to the ... Cape Hatteras southwest of Bermuda for foraging. , This ... one of the most important commercial tuna species in ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... by the National Science Foundation (NSF), counters a ... atmospheric warming, indicating instead that certain Arctic lakes ... the atmosphere. , The study, published this ... on thermokarst lakes, which occur as permafrost thaws ... fresh water, converting what was previously frozen land ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... By tracing nearly 3,000 genes to the earliest ... Florida scientists have created an extensive "Tree of ... next-generation DNA sequencing. , Among the study,s ... to small moths than to large ones, which ... The study also found that some insects once ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Study of bigeye tuna in Northwest Atlantic uses new tracking methods 2Study of bigeye tuna in Northwest Atlantic uses new tracking methods 3Certain Arctic lakes store more greenhouse gases than they release 2UF study advances 'DNA revolution,' tells butterflies' evolutionary history 2UF study advances 'DNA revolution,' tells butterflies' evolutionary history 3
(Date:7/31/2014)... July 31, 2014 Today BioSpace , the leading life ... map campaign spotlighting the life sciences community in Illinois ... Kansas , Michigan , Minnesota ... Ohio and Wisconsin . ... percent of all job postings on BioSpace originating in this region in ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... Nearly 20,000 medical professionals and healthcare leaders ... Clinical Lab Expo in Chicago ... diagnostic research and technology that will advance medicine and ... of Wednesday, July 30, more than 19,500 attendees had ... Lab Expo, with more than 10,000 of these attendees ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... reason people over 60 are not donor candidates for ... with time, making the elderly prone to life-threatening infection ... team now has discovered a reason why. , "We ... of blood-forming cells to maintain blood production over time ... that could be restored for rejuvenation therapies," said Emmanuelle ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... Alan Turing, the British mathematician (1912-1954), is famous for ... the 20th century. In 1936 he published a paper, ... first formal concept of a computer algorithm. He next ... designing the machines which cracked the German military codes, ... crucial battles. And in the late 1940,s he turned ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Midwest Biotech Leaders Featured On BioSpace Map 2Research on Digital Health, Alzheimer's, Ebola Draws Nearly 20,000 Attendees to 2014 AACC Annual Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo 2Research on Digital Health, Alzheimer's, Ebola Draws Nearly 20,000 Attendees to 2014 AACC Annual Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo 3Key to aging immune system is discovered 2A mathematical theory proposed by Alan Turing in 1952 can explain the formation of fingers 2A mathematical theory proposed by Alan Turing in 1952 can explain the formation of fingers 3
Cached News: