HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Peering inside the body, with a new spinliterally

e resolution seen in stationary NMR.

But it's living tissue that holds the most promise for this method, Wind said, because there is no good way to see what is happening in many areas of the body, especially at the boundaries of organs and tissues and bone or air cavities such as lungs and sinuses. Here, the large magnet used in NMR generates small magnetic fields that broaden the spectral lines so much that information about those fine details is lost.

Wind's slow-spin technique, which can generate detailed spectra from these boundary regions, takes advantage of a quirk in NMR. NMR generates a spectral signature of compounds in a sample based on the frequencies of the sample's atomic nuclei as they jiggle in a strong magnetic field. NMR pioneers noticed more than a half-century ago that they could get better spectral resolution if they spun a sample at a 54.74-degree angle to the magnetic field. The faster they spun a sample oriented in this so-called magic angle, the more structural detail they obtained.

"This was very fast spinning, an ultra-centrifuge, thousands of rotations per second," Wind said. "If you tried that with intact tissue or a live animal, you'd blow up your bio-sample and kill the subject."

But what if you could slow the spinning down, so that a live animal could withstand the centrifugal force? The problem with slow MAS is that it produced unwanted signals, what Wind and colleagues call "spinning side bands," that obscured the sample's spectra.

Wind let the idea percolate for about six years as he worked on a combined NMR-optical microscope other devices at the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory on PNNL's Richland, Wash., campus. When he came at the problem again, he brought reinforcements, most notably in the person of NMR expert and PNNL staff scientist Jian Z. Hu.

Working with Hu, Wind found he could get detailed spectra in biological samples at record-slow MAS speeds by us
'"/>

Contact: Bill Cannon
cannon@pnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
14-Sep-2004


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Peering inside a blood vessel
2. Peering at a machine that pries DNA apart
3. Microbes found in Mayan ruins may deteriorate stone from inside out
4. Scripps scientists look deep inside sharks and their high-performance swimming system
5. IUB scientists to study the ecology of infectious disease -- inside ticks
6. 3-D imaging inside living organism, using quantum dots
7. Automated imaging of brain tissue, high-quality glimpses inside arteries
8. Heart disease among some Japanese may be due to sequencing variation inside a gene
9. Tiny bugs in mealybugs have smaller bugs inside them
10. Buffalo neuroimaging researchers studying multiple sclerosis from inside human brain
11. Farming inside forests hurts bird communities more than timber harvesting, study suggests

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Peering inside the body with new spinliterally

(Date:4/22/2014)... in two Minnesota cities demonstrate how communities can ... a ten year program in New England and ... to local conditions. , "Our goal is to ... said program co-leader Latham Stack, of Syntectic International, ... worsened. We help communities move beyond feeling paralyzed ...
(Date:4/21/2014)... is commonly used as a farm soil fertilizer, contains ... from the cows, gut bacteria. The findings, reported in ... American Society for Microbiology, hints that cow manure is ... genes that transfer to bacteria in the soils where ... (AR) genes have already been identified, but the vast ...
(Date:4/21/2014)... are on the decline in the Galpagos. , A new ... indicates numbers of the iconic birds, known for their ... attract mates, have fallen more than 50 percent in less ... is probably due to an unexplained disappearance of sardines from ... at Wake Forest University and the study,s principal investigator. This ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Minnesota projects offer hope and practical help to communities facing more extreme storms 2Cow manure harbors diverse new antibiotic resistance genes 2Cow manure harbors diverse new antibiotic resistance genes 3Lack of breeding threatens blue-footed boobies' survival 2Lack of breeding threatens blue-footed boobies' survival 3
(Date:1/15/2014)... The Pittcon Organizing Committee is pleased to announce that ... an e-Journal and producer of Food Labs Conference ... for the co-location of Food Labs Conference to be held ... registration fee to attend the two-day Food Lab Conference, March ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... 2014 Look inside the new Preferred ... the lab, from fluid handling to instruments to supplies. ... when you order. , Preferred Solutions features a ... the L/S® model for precise flow control and dispensing ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... California , January 15, 2014 Oxford ... today announced the appointment of Thomas C Reynolds MD, PhD ... years, development experience gained in the biotechnology industry, most recently ... am delighted to welcome Tom at this transformative time for ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... This webinar will focus on EMA and ... in biosimilars. , Regulatory frameworks are evolving many countries ... the complex nature of biopharmaceuticals makes the demonstration of ... challenging. Based on the specific aspects of biosimilar drug ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Pittcon Announces Second Year Partnership With Food Safety Tech 2Pittcon Announces Second Year Partnership With Food Safety Tech 3Cole-Parmer Begins 2014 with the Release of Preferred Solutions 2Oxford BioTherapeutics Appoints Thomas C Reynolds MD, PhD to its Board of Directors 2Oxford BioTherapeutics Appoints Thomas C Reynolds MD, PhD to its Board of Directors 3Xtalks Life Sciences Webinar Examines Safety Assessment of Biosimilars 2
Cached News: