HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Potential of tailoring drugs to genetic makeup confirmed--but challenges remain

At a time when harmful drug reactions are thought to rank just after strokes as a leading cause of death in the U.S., the potential benefits of tailoring drugs to a patients genetic makeup have been confirmed in a systematic study led by University of California, San Francisco scientists.

The quantitative assessment of the promise of this new approach known as pharmacogenomics confirms that many harmful drug reactions previously thought to be non-preventable may now actually be averted using genetic information about patients to select their drug therapies.

The study, the first systematic assessment of pharmacogenomics potential, is paired with an analysis of many remaining hurdles: questions about the effectiveness of the practice, inadequate training, funding and sites for carrying out patient genotyping; and the risk of creating inequities when developing drugs to avert problems caused by natural genetic differences linked to race.

The report appears in the November 14 issue of JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The researchers first conducted two independent systematic literature reviews: one on studies reporting adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and one on studies reporting natural genetic variation, or variant alleles in genes for enzymes that metabolize drugs.

They then linked these two studies by focusing on the enzymes from the second search known to metabolize the drugs identified in the first search. This allowed them to assess the possible contribution of genetic variability to ADRs.

The results highlight a strong potential link between the genetic variants and adverse drug reactions. The scientists found that 59 percent of the drugs cited in the ADR study are metabolized by at least one enzyme with a naturally occurring variant known to cause poor metabolism.

Conversely, only 22 percent of randomly selected drugs sold in the U.S. and only 7 percent of randomly selected top-selling
'"/>

Contact: Wallace Ravven
wravven@pubaff.ucsf.edu
415-476-2557
University of California - San Francisco
13-Nov-2001


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Potential for enhanced sequestration of carbon in soils supports evaluations
2. Potential blood test for colon cancer risk
3. Potential new treatment for Gaucher disease developed by scientists at Scripps Research Institute
4. Potential cause of arthritis discovered
5. Potential of regenerative medicine explored
6. Potential therapy reported for children, adults with end-stage liver disease
7. Potential allergy vaccine boosts hope for sufferers
8. Potential new anthrax therapy discovered
9. Potential gene therapy carriers created that mimic viruses, without the risk
10. New Class Of Synthetic Capsules That Mimic Biological Cells Has Wide Array Of Potential Uses
11. Role Of Protein Linked To Colon Cancer Identified, Offering Potential Target For Therapy

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:8/5/2020)... ... August 05, 2020 , ... Regenative Labs has received ... innovations, CoreText™ and ProText™, making them the first Wharton’s jelly allografts to be assigned ... syringe. The company’s solutions are the first Wharton’s jelly allograft product to be recognized ...
(Date:7/31/2020)... ... July 30, 2020 , ... Justin Zamirowski ... with a near term focus on Type 2 diabetes and associated comorbidities. , ... multiple therapeutic areas and classes. As Chief Commercial Officer, Justin will lead ...
(Date:7/18/2020)... ... July 17, 2020 , ... Commercial launch readiness is a critical stage ... a COVID cure or vaccine, the global economic downturn will only increase price pressures ... going away and capturing full value from every product launch is critical. However, history ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:7/10/2020)... , ... July 09, 2020 ... ... company, announced today that Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has expanded the ... license allows PathSensors to move into the point-of-care diagnostic market, focusing initially ...
(Date:7/10/2020)... ... July 09, 2020 , ... Sentien Biotechnologies, ... the hiring of Allen R. Nissenson, M.D., F.A.C.P., as its Chief Medical Officer. ... of Sentien’s lead product, SBI-101. Dr. Nissenson serves as an Emeritus Professor ...
(Date:7/7/2020)... ... July 06, 2020 , ... Bio-IT World has announced ... Bristol-Myers Squibb, the University of Chicago, Massachusetts General Hospital, Mission: Cure, and the ... awards program, highlighting outstanding examples of how technology innovations and strategic initiatives can ...
(Date:7/1/2020)... , ... June 29, 2020 , ... ... to competitively procured purchasing contracts to its membership, recently named BioFit Engineered ... members with the opportunity to purchase ergonomic seating, cafeteria tables, book trucks and ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: